Asee peer logo

Essential Element Examples Of Elementary Engineering In Elementary Education

Download Paper |

Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Emerging Trends in Engineering Education Poster Session

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

11.595.1 - 11.595.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/676

Download Count

50

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Richard Gilbert University of South Florida

visit author page

RICHARD GILBERT is a professor of Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering at the University of South Florida. He has developed educational materials for ISA (Instrument Society of America), AVS (American Vacuum Society) Science Educator’s Workshop, and the National Science Foundation through a grant to develop high school science and math curriculum content. He is currently working with Douglas L. Jamerson, Jr. Elementary School to develop curriculum content for its Center for Math and Engineering.

visit author page

biography

Robert Poth Douglas L. Jamerson Jr. Elementary School

visit author page

ROBERT POTH is the Principal of Douglas L. Jamerson, Jr. Elementary School. He earned his B.A. in Elementary Education and a M.Ed in Educational Leadership from the University of South Florida. He has twenty two years of educational experience including 15 years in the classroom with the last eight years as an administrator. He has served for the past 7 years with the Florida Department of Education on the State Assessment Item Review Team and Standardized Testing Advisory Board. He was one of the writers on the Florida Science Standards Framework. He was honored with the Presidential Award in Elementary Science, the only Pinellas County educator to have received this award.

visit author page

biography

Robin Little Douglas L. Jamerson Jr. Elementary School

visit author page

ROBIN LITTLE is the Engineering Coach at Douglas L. Jamerson, Jr. Elementary School. She earned a B.A. in Elementary Education and a M.Ed. in Educational Leadership from the University of South Florida. Her experiences include over 23 years in early childhood classrooms and six years as a teacher resource and trainer. Robin has curriculum writing experience, including a nationally published teacher resource book integrating science and literature with other areas of the curriculum.

visit author page

biography

Marilyn Barger University of South Florida

visit author page

MARILYN BARGER is the Executive Director of FL-ATE, the Florida Regional Center for Manufacturing Education housed at Hillsborough Community College. She earned a B.A. in Chemistry at Agnes Scott College, and both a B.S. in Engineering Science and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of South Florida. She has over 16 years of experience in developing curriculum in engineering and engineering technology and is a registered professional engineer in the State of Florida. She is currently working with Douglas L. Jamerson, Jr. Elementary School to develop curriculum content for its Center for Mathmatics and Engineering.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Essential Element Examples of Elementary Engineering in Elementary Education

Abstract Developing an engineering curriculum at any level has similar requirements but different challenges. Douglas L. Jamerson, Jr. Elementary School in Pinellas County, Florida is a new school that has a Magnet Schools Assistance Program grant (MSAP) to design, create, and implement a curriculum that matches Jamerson’s mission to be an engineering attractor school. For Jamerson, this attractor is not simply providing an overview of engineering or a quick trip through engineering careers and/or disciplines with occasional stops on the way to work on a project that have some element of engineering associated with it. For example, being a member of a team that can drop an egg the furthest distance without breaking the egg. Although these types of activities are valuable, they are not the essence of an engineering curriculum, nor are such activities necessary to have a good engineering curriculum. This presentation highlights how Jamerson is integrating essential but elementary engineering and engineering science elements across its required State driven curriculum responsibilities. The energy concept and the corresponding conservation laws are presented with specific grade level examples to illustrate intra and inter grade level integration. The presentation will also illustrate how the science driven mandatory State testing on force and motion is used as scaffolding. Upon first glance at this presentation, it might be tempting to conclude that there is very little content in the paper, primarily a flow of ideas about relating children's literature to engineering concepts and/or that the ideas presented are well-known. However, the challenge addressed is not how to teach state-of-the-art engineering to elementary school children. Nor is it to provided occasional or periodic instruction on engineering marvels and/or engineering career possibilities. Rather, the presentation outlines a method to integrate an entire public school state mandated elementary curriculum at all grade levels using engineering science principles and engineering design practices appropriate for each grade level and spirally connecting these principles and practices upward through all grade levels in the school.

Introduction Douglas L. Jamerson, Jr. Elementary School opened two and a half years ago with a daunting challenge. Create a learning institution in a predominantly ethnically isolated inner city area that would naturally integrate the ethnicity of the student population within the school without the aid of a district assigned plan for student placement. To facilitate this challenge, the Pinellas School District provided three key resources. First, a brand new state of the art school complex was provided to create the school around a mathematics and engineering theme. Second, Jamerson was permitted to apply for and subsequently received a 1.5 million dollar Magnet School Assistance Program grant (MSAP). Third, Jamerson was given a wide range of latitude in hiring the staff as well as deviate from district hiring policies and conduct a national search for its teaching staff. One of the requirements of all teachers at Jamerson is that they attain the high standards encompassed in the National Board Certification process and attain this certification within determined period of time. The combination of these three elements has resulted in a dynamic learning community. Students are mastering standards in all subject areas above their current grade and at the same time utilize engineering concepts and principles to foster their thinking and extend the

Gilbert, R., & Poth, R., & Little, R., & Barger, M. (2006, June), Essential Element Examples Of Elementary Engineering In Elementary Education Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/676

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015