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Eteaming With Developing Nations: Social Outreach With An Entrepreneurial Twist

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Teams and Teamwork in Design II

Tagged Division

Design in Engineering Education

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

12.691.1 - 12.691.13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--2830

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2830

Download Count

76

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Paper Authors

biography

Mario Blanco California Institute of Technology

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Ph.D., Chemistry, UCLA (1983). 1993 - present, Director Process Simulation and Design Collaboration, MSC at the Beckman Institute, Caltech, Pasadena, CA. 1990 - 1993 Senior Scientist, Product Manager,Biosym/MSI, Sunnyvale, CA. 1984 - 1990 Senior Scientist, Computer Applications Research, Rohm and Haas Company
HONORS:
2002 Winner 2002 1st Prize in Nanotechnology Design, Institute for Molecular Manufacturing
1991 Science Nominee, Smithsonian Institution
1990 Recipient of Cray Research 1990 Supercomputing Award
1979-84 NICO Canadian Mining Graduate Fellowship
PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES: American Chemical Society
American Academy of Nanomedicine (Founding Member)
UCLA Alumni Association

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Kenneth Pickar California Institute of Technology

biography

Luz Marina Delgado GEMA

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Anthropologist Luz Marina Delgado has a 30 year career devoted to the improvement of the lives of Guatemalan indigenous people. She is the author of "Manos de Mujer" (Woman's Hands), a book documenting indigenous technologies for rural areas in the highlands of Guatemala. Bill Garret, National Geographic Senior Editor, called this book a Survival Manual for Indigenous Guatemalan women.

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biography

Oscar Arce Universidad Rafael Landivar

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Professor, School of Architecture and Design, Universidad Rafael Landivar. Director of the Instituto de Investigación en Diseño (INDIS, Design Research Institute) at Universidad Rafael Landivar.

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Jeff Kranski California Institute of Technology

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Engineering Graduate Student, Teaching Assistant, California Institute of Technology

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Francoise Herrera Universidad Rafael Landivar

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Vice-Dean, Facultad de Ciencias Ambientales y
Agrícolas (FCAA), Universidad Rafael Landivar

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biography

Charles MacVean Universidad Rafael Landivar

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Dean, Facultad de Ciencias Ambientales y
Agrícolas (FCAA), Universidad Rafael Landivar

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

e-Teaming with Developing Nations: Social Outreach with an Entrepreneurial Twist Abstract

The World Bank estimates that over 2.8 billion people live in poverty, earning less than $2/day. Financial assistance alone has not been able to solve the problems generated by poverty in a sustainable way. We are testing the hypothesis that the teaching of product design principles together with basic entrepreneurship skills might be a way to provide longer-lasting solutions. These ideas are based on the premise that although cash might be the most pressing need of the poor, the most vital need is the acquisition of income generation skills. Major challenges arose in the initial testing stage, from the formidable physical and cultural distances that separate the design engineer/teacher from their intended customers in developing nations, to the lack of “ground truth” information to guide the design process. For this reason, over the past two years E105:, Product Design for the Developing World, a Development Engineering course at Caltech, has evolved to include e-Teams as an integral element in its curriculum. The e-Teams bring together students from the US and industrial design and agricultural students from a developing nation. The US engineering students contribute their fast prototyping and analytical problem solving skills while the foreign students contribute their familiarity with poorly defined markets and add cultural sensitivity to the e-Team designs. The students deal with strong constraints on product costs and pricing, evaluate the availability of local materials and the lack of manufacturing and product standards. The e-Team members work together through a variety of electronic communication technologies: Video-conferencing, video streaming, Instant Messaging, Internet telephony, e-mail and web-groups. These electronic tools, which play a role at various levels in the design process, are briefly discussed.

1.0 Introduction

A new effort to find solutions to extreme poverty around the world is taking place at various academic institutions around the United States. A new discipline is emerging, which we will refer here as “Development Engineering”. In some instances, such as at Caltech, it is the students who initiated the effort to create relevant curricula. These efforts have been channeled towards the creation of a new course, E105, Product Design for the Developing World, at Caltech over the last three years. The course gives engineering and design students the opportunity to be creative and to take active leadership roles, exposing them to social, ethical, and political issues that will prepare them to be industrial and community leaders in a world increasingly influenced by issues raised by globalization.

Similar efforts are taking place at MIT [3-6], while at other institutions, such as Georgia Tech, these efforts take a complementary approach in what we now know as “Sustainable Engineering”. Sustainable Engineering emphasis is on conservation and balance of problems brought about in a post-industrial society, problems such as pollution, unmanageable urban sprawl, natural resource conservation, and etcetera. Sustainability seeks to create "... development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs..." [8]. Examples of sustainability include solid waste management and recycling, water saving landscaping, green technologies, and product reuse

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Blanco, M., & Pickar, K., & Delgado, L. M., & Arce, O., & Kranski, J., & Herrera, F., & MacVean, C. (2007, June), Eteaming With Developing Nations: Social Outreach With An Entrepreneurial Twist Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. 10.18260/1-2--2830

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