Asee peer logo

Ethical Identification And Building Trust For The Built Environment: A Systems Approach

Download Paper |

Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Moral Development, Engineering Pedagogy and Ethics Instruction

Tagged Division

Engineering Ethics

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

11.598.1 - 11.598.10

DOI

10.18260/1-2--374

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/374

Download Count

228

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Yilmaz Hatipkarasulu Texas A&M University

visit author page

Yilmaz Hatipkarasulu is an Assistant Professor at Department of Construction Science, Texas A&M University. He holds a BS in Civil Engineering Degree from Cukurova University, Turkey, and MS and PhD Degrees in Civil Engineering from Louisiana State University.

visit author page

biography

James H. Gill, Jr. Jr., Louisiana State University

visit author page

James, H. Gill, Jr. is a Professional in Residence and holder of Contractors Education Trust Fund Chair and Endowed Professorship for Applied Professional Ethics at Department of Construction Management and Industrial Engineering, Louisiana State University. He holds a Business Administration Degree from Louisiana State University and a Juris Doctor Degree from Loyola University.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Ethical Identification and Building Trust for the Built Environment: A Systems Approach

ABSTRACT

Ethics, social responsibility, and trust are critical issues for the built environment from production and professional identity perspectives. In professional degree curriculums, because of the specific areas and topical contents of the degree programs, the relationships and ethical responsibilities are generally illustrated using focused, specific and limited processes such as the design process, construction process and manufacturing process. As a result, the understanding of production objectives, expectancies and relationships among the professions and organizations are missing in a broader sense. This paper presents a systems approach for illustrating a broader picture for improving the understanding in expectancies and relationships among the built environment elements. The system identifies its elements from the creation of the financial sources through design, construction and delivery to the owner and public. The need for the systems thinking is discussed for ethical identification of and building trust for the built environment.

INTRODUCTION

Ethics, social responsibility, and trust are critical issues for the built environment from production and professional identity perspectives. These issues have been recognized by owners, manufacturers, designers and constructors through the creation of the codes of ethics/professional conduct and integration of ethics to the professional degree program curriculums. The codes of ethics/professional conduct are generally defined and enforced through licensing institutions, professional organizations or within individual companies or firms. The educational need for ethics and social responsibility is also noted in the higher education system by the revision of educational curriculums through accrediting agency requirements. However, in professional degree curriculums, because of the specific areas and topical contents of the degree programs, the relationships and ethical responsibilities are generally illustrated using focused, specific and limited processes such as the design process, construction process and manufacturing process. As a result, the understanding of production objectives, expectancies and relationships among the professions and organizations are missing in a broader sense. This understanding is critical in preserving and improving the trust and recognition within the system.

This paper presents a systems approach for illustrating a broader picture for improving the understanding in expectancies and relationships among the built environment elements. The system identifies its elements from the creation of the financial sources through design, construction and delivery to the owner and public. The need for the systems thinking is discussed for ethical identification of and building trust for the built environment.

Hatipkarasulu, Y., & Gill, Jr., J. H. (2006, June), Ethical Identification And Building Trust For The Built Environment: A Systems Approach Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--374

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015