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Ethics and Text Recycling

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engineering Ethics Division Technical Session 2

Tagged Division

Engineering Ethics

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

26.683.1 - 26.683.13

DOI

10.18260/p.24020

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/24020

Download Count

167

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Paper Authors

biography

Marilyn A. Dyrud Oregon Institute of Technology

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Marilyn Dyrud is a full professor in the Communication Department at Oregon Institute of Technology and regularly teaches classes in business and technical writing, public speaking, rhetoric, and ethics; she is part of the faculty team for the Civil Engineering Department’s integrated senior project.

She is active in ASEE as a regular presenter, moderator, and paper reviewer; she has also served as her campus’ representative for 17 years, as chair of the Pacific Northwest Section, and as section newsletter editor. She was named an ASEE Fellow in 2008. Currently, she is on two division boards, Engineering Technology and Engineering Ethics, and has served as Zone IV chair. In 2010, she received the McGraw Award, and in 2013, the Berger Award.

In addition to ASEE, Marilyn is active in the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics as proceedings editor and the Association for Business Communication, serving on the editorial boards of two journals and editing a teaching section for ABC’s pedagogical journal.

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Abstract

Ethics and Text RecyclingRecently, as I was working on a proceedings for a professional conference, I read a veryinteresting paper but there was one catch: the authors had already published it in a differentvenue. Although there were some minor cosmetic changes, it was essentially the same paper. Iraised the issue to the editors, and, after a few emails, we decided to contact the authorsindicating that we could not publish the piece unless it were thoroughly revised. Given the topic,this would be a challenge. We have not, to date, heard from the authors.Many of us who serve professional journals in a review or editorial capacity have probablydiscovered similar papers. In academia, the pressure to publish is high, and sometimes authorstake short-cuts by including blocks of information from their other published works. Whilebuilding upon prior work is a time-honored tradition, can the same be said about using the exactverbiage?This paper will examine the issue of “self-plagiarism,” or, perhaps more accurately, recyclingold text. Specifically, the paper will focus on the following:• Definitions• Common trends and policies• Cases• Ethical considerations• Advice for reviewers and editorsWhile flat-out plagiarism is a usually clear and obvious, the same is not true of authors who copyfrom themselves. Since this practice affects the area of scholarly publishing, it is worthexamining, particularly for ethical import.

Dyrud, M. A. (2015, June), Ethics and Text Recycling Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24020

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015