Asee peer logo

Evaluating Students' Performance In A New Course Sequence With Economic And Design Principles In The Undergraduate Engineering Curriculum

Download Paper |

Conference

1996 Annual Conference

Location

Washington, District of Columbia

Publication Date

June 23, 1996

Start Date

June 23, 1996

End Date

June 26, 1996

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

1.204.1 - 1.204.5

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/6041

Download Count

29

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

William G. Sullivan

author page

W. R. Callen

author page

T. A. Weigel

author page

S. M. Jeter

author page

J. T. Luxhoj

author page

Herman R Leep

author page

Hamid R. Parsaei

author page

Gerald J. Thuesen

author page

C. S. Park

author page

A. Koblasz

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

I Session 1239 .— - ...... Evaluating Students’ Performance in a New Course Sequence with Economic -.. . and Design Principles in the Undergraduate Engineering Curriculum

W. R. Callen, S. M. Jeter, A. Koblasz, G. J. Thuesen/H. R. Parsaei, H. R. Leep, T. A. Weigel/J. T. Luxhoj/C. S. Park/W. G. Sullivan Georgia Institute of Technology/University of Louisville/Rutgers University/ Auburn University/Virginia Polytechnic

ABSTRACT

This paper presents some of the results obtained from a four-year project conducted at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Virginia Polytechnic Institute. For this project, four engineering science courses were modified to include economic and design principles. The primary objective of this experiment was to investigate on how the integration of economic principles with design can effectively be used to teach engineering science courses in the undergraduate engineering curriculum.

Introduction

In 1991. the National Science Foundation funded a multiyear project involving five universities. The project, entitled “The Integration of Economics with Design in the Engineering Science Component of the Undergraduate Curriculum” primarily focused on how the integration of economic principles with design can effectively be used to teach engineering science courses in the undergraduate engineering curriculum. The project also investigated how a stronger design orientation can improve understanding of the economic and technical tradeoffs required in developing processes to transform resources into products

Four courses were initially proposed and subsequently developed during the first two years of the project. These courses included Introduction to Engineering Mechanics, Elements of Thermal Energy Sciences & Systems, Introduction to Electronics & Electromechanical Systems, and Engineering Economy. These courses were primarily developed at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and two of them were beta tested at the University of Louisville in the academic year of 1994-1995 [1-5].

Review of results obtained from Georgia Institute of Technology’s experiments

A total of 274 students at the Georgia Institute of Technology took part in the experiment. Table 1 illustrates the distribution of the participating students.

-- -. - #~A& :4 F 1996 ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings ‘J3H><

Sullivan, W. G., & Callen, W. R., & Weigel, T. A., & Jeter, S. M., & Luxhoj, J. T., & Leep, H. R., & Parsaei, H. R., & Thuesen, G. J., & Park, C. S., & Koblasz, A. (1996, June), Evaluating Students' Performance In A New Course Sequence With Economic And Design Principles In The Undergraduate Engineering Curriculum Paper presented at 1996 Annual Conference, Washington, District of Columbia. https://peer.asee.org/6041

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 1996 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015