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Evaluating the Usefulness of Virtual 3-D Lab Modules Developed for a Flooding System in Student Learning

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session I

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

12

DOI

10.18260/p.26770

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/26770

Download Count

262

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Paper Authors

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Chandramouli Viswanathan Chandramouli Purdue University, Calumet (Engineering)

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Dr. Chandra has more than 20 years of teaching and research experience in Civil Engineering - Hydrology and Water Resources division. His research area includes water resources systems analysis, flood, drought and water quality modeling. He uses artificial intelligence techniques in his research.

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Emily Hixon

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Chenn Q. Zhou Purdue University, Calumet (Engineering)

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John Moreland Purdue University Northwest

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John Moreland is senior research scientist at the Center for Innovation through Visualization and Simulation at Purdue University Northwest. He has MS in Technology, BS in Computer Graphics Technology, and is currently pursuing a PhD in Technology focusing on the application of mixed reality technologies to education.

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Jichao Wang CIVS, Purdue University Calumet

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zitao xiong tappollo

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Rameh Teegavarapu Florida Atlantic University

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Dr. Ramesh Teegavarapu (Dr. T.) is currently an associate professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatics department at Florida Atlantic University (FAU), Boca Raton, Florida and founder and leader of the Hydrosystems Research Laboratory (HRL) in the department. He has over 15 years of experience in the areas of hydrological modeling and water resources systems. Prior to his tenure at FAU, he has worked as Assistant Director of Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute (KWRRI) and Assistant Professor (visiting and adjunct) at University of Kentucky, Research Engineer at University of California, Davis, and visiting research professor at Kobe University, Japan. He has published over 100 technical articles in journals and conference proceedings. He currently serves on the editorial board of three international journals. Dr. Teegavarapu’s current research interests focus on climate variability and change, precipitation processes, water and environmental systems modeling extreme precipitation events, hydroclimatology, spatial interpolation and radar meteorology. Dr. Teegavarapu is a recipient of several national and international awards including the Fulbright Scholar award. He has served as reviewer for a number of panels of several research funding agencies and currently serves as a member of international leadership team on climate change and Climate Change Working (CWG) Group of International Association of Hydro-environmental Research (IAHR). He has presented over 100 talks and 40 research posters including several invited and session keynote lectures. He has chaired, convened and moderated over 55 technical sessions at national and international conferences and served on advisory committees of conferences and as general and technical co-chair of two international conferences. He is an author of several book chapters, a book and is currently serving as an editor of two books with topics related to climate variability and change, sustainable water resources management and trends and changes in hydroclimatic variables.

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Pradeep K. Behera P.E. University of the District of Columbia

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Pradeep Behera, Ph.D., P.E., is a faculty member at the University of the District of Columbia, Washington, D.C. He is currently a Professor and Chair of the Civil Engineering Department. He earned his Ph. D. from the University of Toronto, Canada, in water and environmental engineering. Prior to joining to UDC, he worked as a Senior Water Resources Engineer at BPC Group, Orlando, Fla., and Clarifica, Inc., Richmond Hill, Canada. He served as a Senior Lecturer at the National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India during 1990-1996. His research interests include urban stormwater management, non-point source pollution, water resources engineering, and sustainable urban water systems. He has published several research papers in peer-review journals, book chapters, and international and national conference proceedings. He is a Professional Engineer from the state of Maryland and District of Columbia and is a Diplomat from the American Academy of Water Resources Engineers.

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JAMES FORREST FOX University of Kentucky

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Jimmy Fox is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky USA. Jimmy has expertise in sediment transport, experimental hydraulics, and watershed processes and uses experimental, numerical modeling and field-based approaches within his graduate research program. Jimmy teaches fluid mechanics, sediment mechanics and watershed courses at UK.

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Abstract

High intense rainfall causes floods. Flooding in vulnerable river systems results in huge property damages. Proper understanding of watershed hydrology and river flow hydraulics is essential to flood plain management and mitigation. As a part of the civil engineering curriculum, students learn about these concepts. It is very difficult to create a lab module for a severe flooding scenario. However, new technological developments have made this possible. In this research study, a virtual 3D lab module was created for a watershed called the Little Calumet River System, located in Indiana. This river system drains to the Lake Michigan Watershed. Covering both urban and rural areas, this system was very severely flooded during the 2008 storm Ike. US Army Corps constructed a levee system for more than 20 miles inside the Indiana territory to mitigate the flood. For this watershed system, a watershed rainfall runoff model was developed and calibrated using HEC HMS software and the hydraulic model was developed using HEC RAS software. Using the results of these simulation models, a virtual 3D model was developed in Unity 3D platform. Several scenarios were simulated. The model allows students to develop the simulation model and print the results in a text file format. The 3D model can then be run using these simulation results. This 3D module was used in CE 34200 Hydrology and Hydraulics course as a lab module at Purdue Calumet. Simultaneously, at three other universities namely University of Kentucky, Florida Atlantic University and University of District Columbia, the lab module was used. Using pretest, posttest and surveys, the students were evaluated in all the four universities. Using four semesters of data collection, an analysis of the use of the 3D module was conducted. A total of 128 students participated in the study. Forty-five students were in a control group that did not use the 3D modules, while 83 students were in the treatment group that used the 3D module. Among the total participants, 84% were male and 16% were female. The following research questions guided the research study: 1. Did students who used the 3D module demonstrate greater learning gains than those who did not use the module? 2. Did students who used the 3D module have more favorable perceptions of the instruction than those who did not use the module? 3. What were the perceptions of the learning experience of students who used the 3D modules? 4. For those students who used the 3D module, what factors impacted their learning and their perceptions of their learning experience? Using SPSS, a statistical software tool, the data were analyzed and the present results indicate the following: 1. Students who used the 3D module performed better on questions requiring application of knowledge than students who did not use the 3D module. 2. Use of the 3D module itself did not appear to significantly impact students’ perceptions of their learning experience. 3. Students who used the 3D module rated their experience with the module highly. 4. Vast majority of participants who used the module described the lab module as interesting and enjoyed interacting with it. 5. Vast majority of participants who used the module felt that the 3D lab module enhanced their learning and helped them to link new knowledge with previous knowledge. 6. Majority of participants who used the module were satisfied with the 3D lab module and would like the opportunity to use 3D technology to learn about other topics.

Acknowledgement: We acknowledge the NSF TUES Program for supporting this research.

Chandramouli, C. V., & Hixon, E., & Zhou, C. Q., & Moreland, J., & Wang, J., & xiong, Z., & Teegavarapu, R., & Behera, P. K., & FOX, J. F. (2016, June), Evaluating the Usefulness of Virtual 3-D Lab Modules Developed for a Flooding System in Student Learning Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.26770

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