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Examination of Integrated STEM Curricula as a Means Toward Quality K-12 Engineering Education (Research to Practice)

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

K-12 Engineering Resources: Best Practices in Curriculum Design, Part 2 of 2

Tagged Division

K-12 & Pre-College Engineering

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

24.555.1 - 24.555.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/20446

Download Count

144

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Paper Authors

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Aran W Glancy University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

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Aran W. Glancy is a Ph.D. Candidate in STEM Education with an emphasis in Mathematics Education at the University of Minnesota. He is a former high school mathematics and physics teacher, and he has experience both using and teaching a variety of educational technologies. His research interests include mathematical modeling, computational thinking, and STEM integration. Specifically, he is interested in the ways in which integrating engineering or computer science into mathematics and science classes can support and enhance learning within and across the STEM disciplines.

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Tamara J Moore Purdue University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-7956-4479

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Tamara J. Moore, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Engineering Education at Purdue University. Dr. Moore’s research is centered on the integration of STEM concepts in K-12 and higher education mathematics, science, and engineering classrooms in order to help students make connections among the STEM disciplines and achieve deep understanding. Her research agenda focuses on defining STEM integration and investigating its power for student learning. She is creating and testing innovative, interdisciplinary curricular approaches that engage students in developing models of real world problems and their solutions. Her research also involves working with educators to shift their expectations and instructional practice to facilitate effective STEM integration. Tamara is the recipient of a 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) for her work on STEM integration with underrepresented minority and underprivileged urban K-12 students.

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Siddika Selcen Guzey University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

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Dr. Guzey is a Research Associate at the STEM Education Center at the University of Minnesota. Her research and teaching focus on integrated STEM education.

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Corey A Mathis Purdue University

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Corey A. Mathis earned her B.S. in biology and her M.E.D. in secondary education from Northern Arizona University. Prior to returning to school to obtain a PhD in engineering education at Purdue University, Corey spent nine years as a 7-12 grade Arizona science teacher. While at Purdue she has developed a course for Engineering Technology Pathways in addition to bring statistic to science classrooms though teacher outreach programs.

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Kristina Maruyama Tank Iowa State University

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Emilie A. Siverling Purdue University

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Emilie A. Siverling is a Ph.D. Student in Engineering Education at Purdue University. She received a B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and she is a former high school chemistry and physics teacher. Her research interests are in K-12 STEM integration, primarily using engineering design to support secondary science curricula and instruction.

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Abstract

Examination of Integrated STEM Curricula as a Means Toward Quality K-12 Engineering Education (Research to Practice)Energy behind the push to increase the quantity, quality, and reach of engineering education atthe K-12 level continues to mount. At the same time, more and more schools are looking toenhance their existing science and mathematics instruction by integrating those subjects withtechnology and engineering. The Next Generation Science Standards, published in the earlysummer of 2013, encourage teachers to emphasize the connections between science andengineering and explicitly include learning objectives focused on engineering (NGSS LeadStates, 2013). As states begin to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards or simply look toadd more engineering to their own standards, the need for curricula that integrate the STEMdisciplines will continue to grow. But as integrated STEM curricula are developed, specificallyfor use in science classrooms, we must continually consider the nature of the engineering thatappears in these curricula. In this study, we examine several such curricula in an effort todescribe and characterize the engineering education contained within.As part of an NSF funded curriculum and professional development project, 48 middle schoolscience teachers in three different urban and suburban districts worked with faculty and graduatestudent partners in developing integrated STEM units for their elementary or middle schoolscience classes. The professional development portion of the program provided the severalexample curricula as well as background on engineering and the pedagogical skills necessary tosuccessfully implement this type of curriculum. The teachers then took this knowledge, and insmall groups, worked to create integrated STEM units specifically for their schools and classes.This effort resulted in 22 unique science units, each of which was meant to be centered on anengineering design challenge. Using document analysis, we examined these units to determinethe nature and quality of the engineering the teachers had infused. Our meter stick for qualityengineering came from the Framework for Quality K-12 Engineering Education (AuthorBlinded, 2013). We examined each curriculum module for evidence of the key indicatorscontained in the framework, and used this to determine the strengths, weaknesses, and gaps inthe engineering embedded in these units. The paper will present the results of this analysis alongwith brief descriptions of several of the units. Implications for developing engineering withinintegrated STEM units as well as teaching engineering through this type of curricula will bediscussed.ReferencesAuthor Blinded. (2013). Conference PaperNGSS Lead States. (2013). Next Generation Science Standards: For States, By States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Glancy, A. W., & Moore, T. J., & Guzey, S. S., & Mathis, C. A., & Tank, K. M., & Siverling, E. A. (2014, June), Examination of Integrated STEM Curricula as a Means Toward Quality K-12 Engineering Education (Research to Practice) Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. https://peer.asee.org/20446

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