Asee peer logo

Examining Black Diaspora Participation in Engineering using Narrative Inquiry

Download Paper |

Conference

2021 CoNECD

Location

Virtual - 1pm to 5pm Eastern Time Each Day

Publication Date

January 24, 2021

Start Date

January 24, 2021

End Date

January 28, 2021

Conference Session

CoNECD Session : Day 2 Slot 6 Technical Session 2

Tagged Topics

Diversity and CoNECD Paper Submissions

Page Count

24

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/36085

Download Count

24

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Ekundayo Shittu George Washington University

visit author page

Ekundayo (Dayo) Shittu is an assistant professor of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering at George Washington University. Professor Shittu conducts basic and applied research that take a systems approach to address the different dimensions of decision making under multiple and sequential uncertainties. His focus is on the economics and management of energy technologies, the design and impacts of climate change response policies, sustainability efforts, corporate social responsibility, and patterns of consumer behavior in energy consumption in the emerging era of smart grid technologies. His research interest and initiatives also extend to broadening participation of underrepresented minorities in STEM education.

visit author page

biography

Jennifer Dashiell-Shoffner North Carolina A&T State University

visit author page

Jennifer is a part-time faculty member in the Psychology department at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, NC. She is also a doctoral candidate in the Rehabilitation Counseling and Rehabilitation Counselor Education program. She is well versed in interdisciplinary work and is utilizing her knowledge of human behavior to provide integral insights in this study. She is expected to complete her PhD studies in May 2020.

visit author page

biography

Hyung Nam Kim North Carolina A&T State University

visit author page

Hyung Nam Kim, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at North Carolina A&T State University. He is the director of the Health-Human-Computer Interaction (Health HCI) Lab. His research interests include human factors, human-computer interaction, healthcare and safety.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

This paper examines the use of quantitative research agendas on systems modeling to study anticipatory cognition and cultural competency. This combination results in an integrative science approach to explore the intersectionality of metacognition, academic self-efficacy, stereotype threat, scholarly reasoning and identity among minority black diaspora graduate students. Extant literature focuses on social support models, but the novelty of the approach in this paper examines metacognition in action within a culturally-aware context. Data were collected as semi-structured narrative inquiry to capture metacognition during learning using narrative identity construction as a tool.

There was a total of five students in the study including three females and two male participants in their first year of the graduate studies. However, the analysis focused on three of the participants who provided data consistently for eleven months - two males and one female. The participants provided data including responses to Likert scale questions, and weekly video narratives in response to three sets of questions each week in an n-of-1 big data approach. This approach has the empirical benefit of allowing more inclusive and personalized analyses to draw conclusions. By observing the requirements of an approved IRB protocol, the analysis based on the transcripts of the video recordings, and the examination of change within each individual over time was confidential and conducted with de-identified data. Video recordings are coded and analyzed using HyperRESEARCH version 3.7.5.

The result calibrates students’ comprehension, integration, and application of impactful, data-driven research skills. The metacognitive development portion examines the influence and dynamics of anticipatory cognition, stereotype threat, identity, and academic self-efficacy as the students’ progress through the process of quantitative skills mastery. This paper reports on the highlights of the distilled data on: (i) anticipatory cognition - construct to describe use of prospective memory to simulate future associations and expected outcomes; (ii) academic self-efficacy - captures the perceived level of confidence in the participants to engage successfully in specific cognitive acts associated with academic mastery; (iii) stereotype threat - captures the anxiety associated with the salience of status as a member of a group that is stereotyped as underperforming in a specific area; (iv) identity or categorization of the self as a scholar and engineer. Other themes emerging include perseverance or determination, isolation, extant knowledge, future anticipation, and problem solution focus.

Shittu, E., & Dashiell-Shoffner, J., & Kim, H. N. (2021, January), Examining Black Diaspora Participation in Engineering using Narrative Inquiry Paper presented at 2021 CoNECD, Virtual - 1pm to 5pm Eastern Time Each Day . https://strategy.asee.org/36085

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015