Asee peer logo

Examining the Computing Identity of High-Achieving Underserved Computing Students on the Basis of Gender, Field, and Year in School

Download Paper |

Conference

2018 CoNECD - The Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity Conference

Location

Crystal City, Virginia

Publication Date

April 29, 2018

Start Date

April 29, 2018

End Date

May 2, 2018

Conference Session

Computing Track - Technical Session I

Tagged Topics

Diversity and Computing

Page Count

11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29535

Download Count

161

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

Atalie Garcia

biography

Monique S. Ross Florida International University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-6320-636X

visit author page

Monique Ross, Assistant Professor in the School of Computing and Information Sciences at Florida International University, holds a doctoral degree in engineering education from Purdue University. Her research interests are focused on broadening participation in computing and engineering through the exploration of: 1) race, gender, and identity; and 2) discipline-based education research in order to inform pedagogical practices that garner interest and retain women and minorities in computer-related engineering fields. 

visit author page

biography

Zahra Hazari Florida International University

visit author page

Zahra Hazari is an Associate Professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning and the STEM Transformation Institute as well as an affiliate faculty member in the physics department. Dr. Hazari’s research focuses on reforming physics learning environments in an effort to improve critical educational outcomes for underrepresented groups in physics, especially women.

visit author page

biography

Mark A Weiss Florida International University

visit author page

Mark Allen Weiss is an Eminent Scholar Chaired Professor, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education in the College of Engineering and Computing, and Associate Director in the School of Computing and Information Sciences at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami Fla.

He joined FIU after receiving his Ph.D. in computer science from Princeton University in 1987. His interests include data structures, algorithms, and education, and he is most well-known for his Data Structures textbooks, which have been used at hundreds of universities worldwide. From 1997 to 2004 he served as a member of the Advanced Placement Computer Science Development Committee, chairing the committee from 2000 to 2004. Dr. Weiss is an ACM Distinguished Educator, AAAS Fellow, and the recipient of the 2015 SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education and 2017 IEEE Taylor Booth Education Award.

visit author page

biography

Tiana Solis Florida International University

visit author page

Tiana Solis is currently the Associate Director of Academic Advising and a lecturer at the School of Computing and Information Sciences, Florida International University. Prior to moving to Hawaii in 2007, she was an instructor and academic adviser for the school from 1994 to 2007. Ms. Solis taught different undergraduate courses and mentored several FIU students participating in the Florida-Georgia Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (FGLSAMP). She is a past adviser of the Women in Computer Science (WICS) student club. From 2008 to 2010, Ms. Solis was a programmer analyst at the Department of the Attorney General in Hawaii and a member of the team revamping the State Juvenile Justice Information System.
Her research and instructional Interests include programming languages, computer ethics, and student development.

visit author page

author page

Mohsen Taheri Florida International University

Download Paper |

Abstract

As technology increases in the global arena and the necessity for a more diverse group of individuals to fulfill engineering and computing roles increases, it is important to engage more students in computing majors and roles. Identity has proven to be an important lens through which researchers can better understand how to engage students in these fields. In particular, our framing for computing identity includes students’ self-perceptions about recognition, interest, and performance/competence. Using survey data, this study examines the computing identity of high achieving underserved students in computer science (CS), computer engineering (CE), and information technology (IT). For these students, we compare the constructs between men and women, computing fields, and freshmen and juniors/seniors. Based on preliminary data, results show that female participants had less of a computing identity than male students, specifically with respect to computing recognition and overall computing identity. Students in IT programs had less of an overall computing identity than students in CS and CE. Finally, freshmen were lower on their overall computing identities and specifically performance/competence beliefs and interest. These results suggest that even within computing programs, students differ in their computing identities. Furthermore, there are different constructs related to computing identity that vary for different subgroups of students. While these results are insightful, future work will compare the computing identities of high achieving underserved students with a larger population of computing students as well as strategies for building their computing identities.

Garcia, A., & Ross, M. S., & Hazari, Z., & Weiss, M. A., & Solis, T., & Taheri, M. (2018, April), Examining the Computing Identity of High-Achieving Underserved Computing Students on the Basis of Gender, Field, and Year in School Paper presented at 2018 CoNECD - The Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity Conference, Crystal City, Virginia. https://peer.asee.org/29535

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2018 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015