Asee peer logo

Examining the Connection Between Student Mastery Learning Experiences and Academic Motivation

Download Paper |

Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

First-Year Programs: Metacognition, Self-Efficacy, and Motivation #1

Tagged Division

First-Year Programs

Page Count

16

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34615

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/34615

Download Count

119

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Cara Mawson Rowan University

visit author page

Cara is a graduate student pursuing her Ph.D. in Experiential Engineering Education (ExEEd) at Rowan University. Her research focuses on the relationship between gamification and motivation in undergraduate engineering students. Previously she earned a B.S. in Physics where she performed research in biophysics, astrophysics, and cosmology. In addition, she has taught science, computer science, and technology through Project Lead The Way at a middle school in Phoenix, Arizona.

visit author page

biography

Cheryl A. Bodnar Rowan University

visit author page

Dr. Bodnar is an Associate Professor in the Experiential Engineering Education Department at Rowan University. Her research interests relate to the incorporation of active learning techniques such as game-based learning in undergraduate classes as well as integration of innovation and entrepreneurship into the engineering curriculum. In particular, she is interested in the impact that these tools can have on student perception of the classroom environment, motivation and learning outcomes. She was selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium in 2013, awarded the American Society for Engineering Education Educational Research Methods Faculty Apprentice Award in 2014 and the Raymond W. Fahien Award for Outstanding Teaching Effectiveness and Educational Scholarship presented by American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Chemical Engineering Division in 2017.

visit author page

biography

Scott Streiner Rowan University

visit author page

Dr. Scott Streiner is an assistant professor in the Experiential Engineering Education Department (ExEEd) at Rowan University. He received his Ph.D in Industrial Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, with a focus in engineering education. His research interests include engineering global competency, curricula and assessment; pedagogical innovations through game-based and playful learning; spatial skills development and engineering ethics education. His funded research explores the nature of global competency development by assessing how international experiences improve the global perspectives of engineering students. Dr. Streiner has published papers and given presentations in global engineering education at several national conferences. Scott is an active member in the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL) both locally and nationally, as well as the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers (IISE).

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

This complete research paper examines the impact of mastery learning homework on student academic motivation in a first year engineering course. Student learning in undergraduate engineering is most effective when it occurs both inside and outside of the classroom. For this reason, homework can be a useful tool for formative assessment. One approach to homework that has shown promise in increasing retention of course material is mastery learning. The mastery learning approach to education theorizes that any student can meet high standards for learning given the right circumstances. Specifically, a student that is learning for mastery should have personalized instruction, an appropriate amount of time, and the ability to persevere. Mastery learning approaches in engineering education have been proven to increase student learning without adding a significant amount of time and effort on the part of the instructor. In this study, a gamified online homework platform incorporates a mastery learning approach to gain insight into a student’s persistence and academic motivation for completing homework. This research seeks to answer the following research questions: 1) Which content areas do students struggle with more than others on an online mastery learning homework system? And 2) What relationship exists between the number of attempts on an online mastery learning homework system and students’ academic motivation? The number of attempts for mastery level completion across different content areas was collected alongside an academic motivation questionnaire. A one-way ANOVA was utilized to study the number of attempts for mastery level completion across different content areas as specified in research question one. The results of the academic motivation questionnaire were analyzed using Pearson correlations and independent samples T-tests. The results are presented with tests for statistical significance and Cohen’s D values. Results of this research are promising first steps in gaining a better understanding of how engineering students work through mastery learning homework, the impacts it can have on their academic motivation.

Mawson, C., & Bodnar, C. A., & Streiner, S. (2020, June), Examining the Connection Between Student Mastery Learning Experiences and Academic Motivation Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34615

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2020 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015