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Excellence In Engineering Education And Educational Technology: Views Of Undergraduate Engineering Students

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Curricula of the Past, Present, and Future

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

17

Page Numbers

11.610.1 - 11.610.17

DOI

10.18260/1-2--872

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/872

Download Count

148

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Paper Authors

biography

Cristina Pomales-Garcia University of Michigan

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Cristina Pomales-García is a graduate student in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan. She received a B.S. in psychology from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez in 2001 and a M.S. from the University of Michigan in 2003. Her research interests are engineering aesthetics, educational technology, distance learning technology and engineering education. Address: 1205 Beal Ave. Ann Arbor, MI 48109; e-mail:cpomlaes@umich.edu

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biography

Yili Liu University of Michigan

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Yili Liu is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Associate Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan. His Ph.D. is in Engineering and Cognitive Psychology from the University of Illinois. His research and teaching interests include cognitive modeling, cognitive ergonomics, cognitive psychology, engineering aesthetics, human factors, and human-computer interaction

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Virginia Soto University of Michigan

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Virginia Soto Pinto is an undergraduate student in the department of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Excellence in Engineering Education and Educational Technology: Views of Undergraduate Engineering Students

Abstract

During the 1990’s and continuing today there has been an increased attention to understand the issues that may affect the quality of engineering education. According to the National Academy of Engineering 1 and programs such as the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), many universities around the world have been making major efforts to recognize the challenges faced by engineering educational programs and making changes to achieve “Excellence in Engineering Education”. The purpose of the study reported in this paper is to understand the views and perceptions of engineering undergraduate students on engineering education in general and educational technology in particular. The method of content analysis was used to analyze the language used by engineering undergraduate students and extract the underlying common factors or perceived characteristics of excellence in engineering education. These common factors were then used to identify the similarities and differences in views between engineering students and educational researchers by comparing our observations with what has been reported in the literature. Twenty-two undergraduate engineering students (7 females and 15 males) participated voluntarily in this study to answer four individual questions about (1) excellence in engineering education, (2) educational technology, (3) the student’s role in the engineering college, and (4) the professor’s role in the engineering college. The participants were instructed to write 10 words or phrases that come to their mind when they think about each of the questions and rank their answers in the order of importance. Following the individual questions, ten questions were discussed in a focus group. The results of the study showed that when it comes to evaluation of education and teaching methods, students would like to see more opportunities to give input in the system and be more involved as part of the creation in all levels and steps. Current literature on Excellence in Engineering Education stresses the importance of skills and knowledge but leaves out two aspects stressed by the student participants: (1) the technology component and (2) building of relationships and a community of learning. The participants in this study described or characterized excellence in engineering education as: clear, complex, comprehensive, detailed, diverse, efficient, interactive, international, multidisciplinary, personalized, precise, scientific, specialized, and stimulating. The implications of the research results on excellence in engineering education are discussed.

Introduction

Excellence in Engineering Education

During the 1990’s and continuing today there has been a great movement towards understanding the issues that may affect the quality of engineering education. According to the National Academy of Engineering and programs such as the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), many universities around the world have been making major efforts to recognize the challenges faced by engineering educational programs and make changes to achieve what many are calling “Excellence in Engineering Education”. As one example of the programs developed recently, in 2002, the National Academy of Engineering launched the Center for the Advancement of Scholarship on Engineering Education (CASEE) 1. Its purpose is

Pomales-Garcia, C., & Liu, Y., & Soto, V. (2006, June), Excellence In Engineering Education And Educational Technology: Views Of Undergraduate Engineering Students Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--872

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015