Asee peer logo

Experiments In Drug Delivery For Undergraduate Engineering Students

Download Paper |

Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Division

Division Experimentation & Lab-Oriented Studies

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

11.624.1 - 11.624.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/245

Download Count

775

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Stephanie Farrell Rowan University

visit author page

STEPHANIE FARRELL is Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. She received her B.S. from the University of Pennsylvania, her MS from Stevens Institute of Technology, and her Ph.D. from New Jersey Institute of Technology. Prior to joining Rowan in September, 1998, she was a faculty member in Chemical Engineering at Louisiana Tech University. Stephanie has research expertise in the field of drug delivery and controlled release, and she is currently focusing efforts on developing laboratory experiments related to membrane separations, biochemical engineering, and biomedical systems.

visit author page

biography

Mariano Savelski Rowan University

visit author page

MARIANO J SAVELSKI is Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. He received his B.S. in 1991 from the University of Buenos Aires, his ME in 1994 from the University of Tulsa and his Ph.D. in 1999 from the University of Oklahoma. His technical research is in the area of process design and optimization with over seven years of industrial experience. His prior academic experience includes two years as Assistant Professor in the Mathematics Department at the University of Buenos Aires.

visit author page

biography

Robert Hesketh Rowan University

visit author page

ROBERT HESKETH is Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. He received his B.S. from the University of Illinois and his Ph.D. from the University of Delaware. After his Ph.D. he conducted research at the University of Cambridge, England, and joined the faculty at the University of Tulsa in 1996. Robert employs innovative methods such as cooperative learning and inductive teaching techniques in his classes

visit author page

biography

C. Stewart Slater Rowan University

visit author page

C. STEWART SLATER is Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. He received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. from Rutgers University. Prior to joining Rowan, he was Professor of Chemical Engineering at Manhattan College. Dr. Slater's research and teaching interests are in separation and purification technology, laboratory development, and investigating novel processes for fields such as bio/pharmaceutical/food engineering and specialty chemical manufacture.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Experiments in Drug Delivery for Undergraduate Engineering Students

Introduction Drug Delivery is a burgeoning field that represents one of the major research and development focus areas of pharmaceutical industry today, with new drug delivery system sales exceeding 54 billion dollars per year 1. Chemical Engineers play an important and expanding role in this exciting field, yet undergraduate chemical engineering students are rarely exposed to drug delivery through their coursework. To provide students with the skills directly relevant to the evolving needs of the pharmaceutical industry, this we have developed and integrated applied drug delivery coursework and experiments throughout the Rowan Engineering curriculum. To design and produce a new drug delivery system, an engineer must fully understand the drug and material properties and the processing variables that affect the release of the drug from the system. This requires a solid grasp of the fundamentals of mass transfer, reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. He or she must also be skilled in characterization techniques and physical property testing of the delivery system, and practiced in the analysis of the drug release data. We have developed several classroom and laboratory modules that introduce students to multidisciplinary engineering principles through application to drug delivery systems. Each module comprises experiments for the design, preparation, characterization, and analysis of a variety of drug delivery systems. This paper describes experiments developed to investigate tablets, transdermal patch systems, drug stability and supercritical fluid applications. Experiments related to ointments and microcapsules are also being developed, and are described here. The experimental methods and engineering concepts used to analyze drug delivery systems are presented, and the role of the engineer in this field is explored. Controlled drug delivery systems attempt to deliver a drug to the body at a controlled rate for an extended period of time. Historically, drug delivery systems were developed primarily for traditional routes of administration such as oral and intravenous. Recently, however, there has been an explosion in research on delivery by so-called non-conventional routes, such as transdermal, nasal, ocular, and pulmonary administration. Drug delivery applications have expanded from traditional drugs to therapeutic peptides, vaccines, hormones, and viral vectors for gene therapy. These systems employ a variety of rate-controlling mechanisms, including matrix diffusion, membrane diffusion, biodegradation and osmosis. To design and produce a new drug delivery system, an engineer must fully understand the drug and material properties and the processing variables that affect the release of the drug from the system. This requires a solid grasp of the fundamentals of mass transfer, reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. He or she must also be skilled in characterization techniques and physical property testing of the delivery system, and practiced in the analysis of the drug release data.

The engineering goals of this project are (1) to explore different types of drug delivery systems; (2) to study drug delivery designs in a quantitative manner using engineering principles; (3) to use up-to-date industrial techniques for the production, testing and analysis of drug delivery systems; and (4) to evaluate factors influencing the drug release from a delivery system.

Farrell, S., & Savelski, M., & Hesketh, R., & Slater, C. S. (2006, June), Experiments In Drug Delivery For Undergraduate Engineering Students Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/245

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015