Asee peer logo

Exploring Ethical Hacking from Multiple Viewpoints

Download Paper |

Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Computing and Information Technology Division Technical Session 7

Tagged Division

Computing and Information Technology

Page Count

11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34640

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/34640

Download Count

383

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Radana Dvorak University of Portland

visit author page

Dr. Dvorak received her Ph.D. in computer science from the University of London, Queen Mary College, and Master’s degree in AI from the University of Sussex. Dr. Dvorak has been working in IT, higher education, academic industry and program development for over 25 years. She has served as a researcher, university professor and dean in the US, UK, and the Cayman Islands. Currently, Dr. Dvorak is the Director of the University of Portland Shiley School of Engineering Bachelor of Computer Science Post-Baccalaureate program, and an instructor in computer science, teaching various CS courses. Her current research interests are related to teaching in STEM fields. She advises the cybersecurity club, and is a member of several organizations including OWASP-Portland Chapter. Dr. Dvorak is passionate about teaching, technology, career pathways and student success.

visit author page

biography

Heather Dillon University of Portland Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-4467-2306

visit author page

Dr. Heather Dillon is an Associate Professor in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Portland. She recently served as the Fulbright Canada Research Chair in STEM Education. Her research team is working on energy efficiency, renewable energy, fundamental heat transfer, and engineering education. Before joining the university, Heather Dillon worked for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a senior research engineer.

visit author page

biography

Nicole Ralston University of Portland

visit author page

Dr. Nicole Ralston is an Assistant Professor and co-Director of the Multnomah County Partnership for Education Research (MCPER) in the School of Education at the University of Portland in Portland, Oregon. She received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in Measurement, Statistics, and Research Design from the University of Washington. An elementary school teacher at heart, she now teaches educational research and STEM methods to undergraduate and graduate students. Her research focus involves bringing active learning strategies to STEM, best practices of research-practice partnerships, and applied research in partnership.

visit author page

biography

Jeffrey Matthew Welch University of Portland Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4072-7186

visit author page

Jeff Welch is a doctoral student in educational leadership at the University of Portland (Oregon, USA).

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

The Shiley School of Engineering, Dept. of Computer Science is using the KEEN module to develop an entrepreneurial mindset while meeting technical objectives in a 300 level Unix/Linux tools course. This paper describes a work-in-progress module for students to explore issues related to ethical hacking and its impact in the field of information security and cybersecurity. Ethical hacking was analyzed from multiple viewpoints including industry, governments and regulatory authorities, n white hat, grey hat and black hat hacking, and analyzing trends and perspectives from industry and research. Student engaged in activities including four corners to explore ethical hacking before and after reading case studies, and also participated in group and classroom discussions. After the initial exploration, students engaged in practical exercises exploring Kali Linux and learning basic penetration and defense techniques which introduced them to tools and skills utilized in the cybersecurity industry. The objectives and the design of the survey was to explore if the module increased students' curiosity and awareness of ethical hacking as they will be confronted with security issues in their software engineering careers. Students were asked to rank the learning objectives on a Likert scale of 1 to 5 where 1 was the worst ranking and 5 was the best ranking Generally, the results of the survey demonstrated students ranked the objectives well, with the lowest score for the objective about developing an action plan for ethics indicating ways to improve the module in future course offering. The highest values were given to considering multiple viewpoints, indicating the mindset aspects of the project may have been successful. Based on the outcome and student feedback recommendations for future implementation of the module in the curriculum is discussed.

Dvorak, R., & Dillon, H., & Ralston, N., & Welch, J. M. (2020, June), Exploring Ethical Hacking from Multiple Viewpoints Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34640

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2020 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015