Asee peer logo

Exploring How Faculty Mentoring Influences Faculty Productivity

Download Paper |

Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Faculty Development Division Poster Session

Tagged Division

Faculty Development Division

Page Count

7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37144

Download Count

17

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Steven Edalgo Clemson University

visit author page

I am a Ph.D student in Engineering and Science Education at Clemson University. My academic background is in Pure Mathematics and Mathematics Education.

visit author page

biography

Karen A. High Clemson University

visit author page

Dr. Karen High holds an academic appointment in the Engineering Science and Education Department (ESED) at Clemson University. Prior to this Dr. Karen was at Oklahoma State University where she was a professor for 24 years in Chemical Engineering. She received her B.S. in chemical engineering from University of Michigan in 1985 and her M.S. in 1988 and Ph.D. in 1991 in chemical engineering both from Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Karen’s educational research emphasis includes faculty development and mentoring, graduate student development, critical thinking and communication skills, enhancing mathematical student success in Calculus (including Impact of COVID-19), and promoting women in STEM. Her technical research focuses on sustainable chemical process design, computer aided design, and multicriteria decision making. She also has extensive experience in K-12 STEM education and program evaluation and assessment. She has held a variety of administrative positions: 1) Director of STEM Faculty Development Initiatives-Clemson, 2) Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences-Clemson, 3) Interim Director of Student Services-Oklahoma State University, 4) Coordinator of the Women in Engineering Program-Oklahoma State University, and 5) Director of the Oklahoma State University Measurement and Control Engineering Center-Oklahoma State University.

visit author page

biography

Gary Lichtenstein Arizona State University

visit author page

Gary Lichtenstein, Ed.D., Director of Program Effectiveness for the Entrepreneurial Mindset initiative at the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University. He is also and founder and principal of Quality Evaluation Designs, a firm specializing in research and evaluation for K-12 schools, universities, and government and non-profit organizations nationwide. He specializes in entrepreneurship education, research and evaluation methods, and STEM retention.

visit author page

biography

Cindy M. Lee Clemson University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4058-8251

visit author page

Cindy M. Lee serves as the department chair of Clemson University's Engineering and Science Education Department, a graduate-only department that offers a graduate certificate program in STEM education pedagogy and introduction to education research methods as well as a PhD program in STEM education research. Cindy's research and teaching has focused on graduate education, sustainability education, and environmental chemistry. She has served as the founding program manager for the NSF Environmental Sustainability program. Cindy is an associate editor for environmental chemistry for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

visit author page

biography

Joyce B. Main Purdue University at West Lafayette Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-3984-533X

visit author page

Joyce B. Main is Associate Professor of Engineering Education at Purdue University. She received an Ed.M. in Administration, Planning, and Social Policy from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a Ph.D. degree in Learning, Teaching, and Social Policy from Cornell University. Dr. Main examines student academic pathways and transitions to the workforce in science and engineering. She was a recipient of the 2014 American Society for Engineering Education Educational Research and Methods Division Apprentice Faculty Award, the 2015 Frontiers in Education Faculty Fellow Award, and the 2019 Betty Vetter Award for Research from WEPAN. In 2017, Dr. Main received a National Science Foundation CAREER award to examine the longitudinal career pathways of engineering PhDs.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Faculty productivity is crucial for success during for tenure and promotion and beyond. Research suggests that mentoring during the tenure journey has positive effects. However, research linking the positive effects of mentoring to faculty productivity is lacking. Only a few studies have been published linking faculty mentoring and productivity, with most focusing on research and scholarship productivity. In this study, we conceptualize faculty productivity as an outgrowth of the entrepreneurial mindset. Exploring how faculty mentoring influences faculty productivity includes identifying which entrepreneurial competencies are promoted through mentoring. Our conceptual framework looks at relationships between personal and professional goals and their alignment with tenure expectations, early career faculty’s understanding of tenure expectations, and self-efficacy for meeting those expectations—all of which can be influenced positively or negatively through mentoring. Understanding these relationships can provide guidance for mentors and mentees in navigating the mentoring relationship and progress toward tenure. In this study, we use an exploratory sequential mixed methods design. The research will have an exploratory phase followed by two phases, one qualitative in nature and the next quantitative in nature. The first step of our research design consists of developing a conceptual framework, performing a synthesis of existing literature, and revising the conceptual framework based on the synthesis. We interviewed 14 pre-tenured faculty in Engineering and Engineering Education who are approaching consideration for tenure from academic institutions across the United States. The data are in the process of being coded by a team of graduate and undergraduate students using a priori coding developed from the conceptual framework. This research work highlights elements/structures for successful mentoring that promote the entrepreneurial mindset and how they relate to faculty productivity. The focus on the relationships between mentoring and faculty productivity is critical because productivity is a major consideration in tenure and promotion processes. Faculty productivity is inherently needed in faculty development. Faculty productivity also contributes to institutional success and the success of the field, regardless of whether faculty achieves tenure or stays at the institution. An overview of this work will be presented in a work in progress session or a poster.

Edalgo, S., & High, K. A., & Lichtenstein, G., & Lee, C. M., & Main, J. B. (2021, July), Exploring How Faculty Mentoring Influences Faculty Productivity Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37144

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015