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Exporting America: First Technologies, Then Engineering Management Skills, What’s Next? A Case Study From An Engineering Education Perspective

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

International Case Studies, Collaborations and Interactions

Tagged Division

International

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

11.626.1 - 11.626.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/729

Download Count

12

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Paper Authors

biography

James Zhang Western Carolina University

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JAMES Z. ZHANG is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Program at Western Carolina University. Dr. Zhang’s research interests include Communications Theory, Wireless Networks, Bandwidth Efficient Modulation Schemes, Signal Design and Information Coding, and Digital Signal Processing Techniques for Communications. He is a senior member of IEEE and a member of ASEE.

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biography

Kenneth Burbank Western Carolina University

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KEN BURBANK is an Associate Professor and Director of Electrical Engineering Program at Western Carolina University. Dr. Burbank is active with IEEE, SME, and TAC of ABET, and strives to bring practical engineering activities into the classroom. His current project is the development of a photonics program within the Electrical Engineering curriculum.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Exporting America: First Technologies, Then Engineering Management Skills, What’s Next? - A Case Study from an Engineering Education Perspective

Abstract

This paper presents the results of our research on the process of exportation from an engineering education perspective. Our research uses the Chinese engineering market as an example, focuses on the changes of market demands at various development stages in terms of technologies, engineering personnel, and engineering management skills.

From an engineering education standpoint, we view the exportation model as a process of knowledge transfer at different levels. This paper demonstrates our findings based on the statistics we collect through our research.

Finally, we attempt to predict what the next market demand is in this exportation model, and try to give our suggestions as to what engineering educators can do to keep our engineering professionals on the competitive edge.

Introduction

During the past decade, the lost jobs attributable to international trade and offshore outsourcing are significant and widespread. According to the Economic Policy Institute, 935,000 of the manufacturing jobs lost between 2000 and 2003. The loss was mainly due to the rising trade deficit. The Progressive Policy Institute estimated that around 840,000 manufacturing jobs were lost between 2001 and 2004 due to increased imports and decreased exports. Goldman Sachs estimated 400,000 to 600,000 of the professional service and information sector jobs lost over the past few years have been shipped overseas. Based on the analysis and forecast from Forrester Research, American companies will move 3.2 million jobs offshore by 2015 1-3. Among these lost jobs, most of them are engineering and technical jobs.

Zhang, J., & Burbank, K. (2006, June), Exporting America: First Technologies, Then Engineering Management Skills, What’s Next? A Case Study From An Engineering Education Perspective Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/729

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