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Exposing Undergraduates to Design, Fabrication, and Large-Scale Experimentation in a Structural Steel Design Course

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

High-Impact Teaching and Learning

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Page Count

34

DOI

10.18260/1-2--32824

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32824

Download Count

30

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Paper Authors

biography

Jenna Williams California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Jenna Williams is an undergraduate architectural engineering student at California Polytechnic State University – San Luis Obispo. She has been engaged in structural engineering through leadership roles in Cal Poly's Structural Engineers Association of California (SEAOC) student chapter, the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) Undergraduate Seismic Design Competition team, and the Structural Engineering Students for Humanity (SESH) which assists with post-earthquake recovery in developing nations. In addition, she has previously been engaged in Cal Poly’s Society of Women Engineers collegiate chapter as a leader and as an advocate for women in STEM to elementary school, middle school, and high school students in California. After graduation, she plans to pursue a masters degree in structural engineering to further her understanding of the interaction between architecture, structures, and construction.

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Mark William Wright LEED Green Associate California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Mark Wright is an undergraduate architectural engineering student at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. He has held leadership roles in Cal Poly’s Structural Engineering Association of California (SEAOC)/Architectural Engineering Institute (AEI) student chapter and the National Student Organization of the Architectural Engineering Institute (AEI NSO). Additionally, he has assisted with Cal Poly’s Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) Undergraduate Seismic Design Competition team, AEI Student Design Competition team, and post-earthquake disaster relief with Structural Engineering Students for Humanity (SESH). After graduation, he seeks to practice structural engineering in the United States and pursue disaster relief outside of work.

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Michael James Deigert California Polytechnic State University

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Anahid Behrouzi California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Anahid Behrouzi is an assistant professor of architectural engineering at California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo. She has been involved with STEM education beginning in 2003 as a volunteer and summer instructor with the North Carolina Museum of Life and Science. She has been engaged with undergraduate/graduate course delivery in the topic areas of engineering problem-solving and structural engineering at North Carolina State University (2008-2011), the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2012-2015), Tufts University (2015-2016), and Cal Poly - San Luis Obispo (2016-present). She has a BS in civil engineering and BA in Spanish language & literature from North Carolina State University, and a MS/PhD in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Abstract

During Fall 2017, Spring and Fall 2018 quarters, various hands-on design, fabrication, and large-scale experimental projects were incorporated into a 10-week undergraduate structural steel design course offered in the Department of Architectural Engineering at California Polytechnic State University – San Luis Obispo. Through these projects students investigated one or two unique steel lateral force resisting systems (LFRS) consisting of either: special moment frame (SMF), special concentric braced frame (SCBF), and/or buckling restrained braced frame (BRBF). Students completed design calculations per the American Institute of Steel Construction steel building and seismic codes, visualized their final design using AutoCAD software, constructed and tested the LFRS specimen. Finally, students compared test results to predictions determined via code equations.

These new projects offer a novel approach for engaging students in the process of learning steel design where they practice the technical structural design and analysis competencies while refining visual/written/oral communication, project management, construction, experimentation, and data analysis skills. Student feedback collected for each course offering indicated that students had a better visual and physical understanding of various steel LFRS systems by undergoing the complete cycle of design, fabrication, testing, and analysis. As a result, students were able to more fully comprehend consequences of their design decisions, lessons which they will hopefully draw on in their future structural engineering career focusing on seismic design.

Williams, J., & Wright, M. W., & Deigert, M. J., & Behrouzi, A. (2019, June), Exposing Undergraduates to Design, Fabrication, and Large-Scale Experimentation in a Structural Steel Design Course Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--32824

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