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Faculty Perspectives About Incorporating Academic Integrity into Engineering Courses

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engineering Ethics Division Technical Session 4

Tagged Division

Engineering Ethics

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

26.767.1 - 26.767.16

DOI

10.18260/p.24104

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24104

Download Count

100

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Paper Authors

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Shiyu Liu Pennsylvania State University

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Shiyu Liu is a postdoctoral scholar at the Leonhard Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Education at Pennsylvania State University. She has a B.S. in applied psychology, a M.A. and Ph.D. in educational psychology. Her research focuses on teacher professional development in STEM education and factors that affect K-16 STEM learning.

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Sarah E Zappe Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Dr. Sarah Zappe is Research Associate and Director of Assessment and Instructional Support in the Leonhard Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Education at Penn State. She holds a doctoral degree in educational psychology emphasizing applied measurement and testing. In her position, Sarah is responsible for developing instructional support programs for faculty, providing evaluation support for educational proposals and projects, and working with faculty to publish educational research. Her research interests primarily involve creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship education.

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Irene B. Mena University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

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Irene B. Mena has a B.S. and M.S. in industrial engineering, and a Ph.D. in engineering education. Her research interests include first-year engineering and graduate student professional development.

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Thomas A. Litzinger Pennsylvania State University, University Park

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Thomas A. Litzinger is Director of the Leonhard Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Education and a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Penn State. His work in engineering education involves curricular reform, teaching and learning innovations, assessment, and faculty development. Dr. Litzinger has more than 50 publications related to engineering education including lead authorship of an invited article in the 100th Anniversary issue of JEE and for an invited chapter on translation of research to practice for the first edition of the Cambridge Handbook of Engineering Education Research. He serves as an Associate Editor for Advances in Engineering Education and on the Advisory Board for the Journal of Engineering Education. He was selected as a Fellow of ASEE in 2008 and of ASME in 2012. He holds a B.S. in Nuclear Engineering from Penn State, an M.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering from RPI, and a Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton.

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Kirsten S Hochstedt Penn State University

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Kirsten Hochstedt is a graduate assistant at the Leonhard Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Education. She received her M.S. in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in educational and psychological measurement at Penn State University and is currently a doctoral candidate in the same program. The primary focus of her research concerns assessing the response structure of test scores using item response theory methodology.

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Tricia Bertram Gallant Rady School of Management, UC San Diego

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Dr. Bertram Gallant is a Lecturer with the Rady School of Management and Director of the Academic Integrity Office at UC San Diego. She is also the Outreach Coordinator for the International Center for Academic Integrity (Clemson University).

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Abstract

Faculty Perspectives on the Challenges and Strategies in Creating an Ethical Classroom This study explores how faculty perceive the effectiveness of a professionaldevelopment workshop on academic integrity, as well as the challenges they experiencewhen incorporating academic integrity into their courses. This research was embedded inthe context of a new initiative in the College of Engineering at a large Mid-AtlanticUniversity that aims to enhance engineering students’ understanding of academicintegrity and professional ethics. As part of this initiative, a professional developmentworkshop was provided to faculty in different engineering programs. The overarchinggoal of the workshop was to prepare faculty for infusing academic integrity andprofessional ethics into undergraduate engineering courses. The two-day workshop tookplace in the summer of 2013, where faculty developed and shared strategies forincorporating academic integrity into classroom activities and assignments. To evaluate the effectiveness of this workshop, seven faculty participants wereinterviewed after they implemented the new strategies in the semester following theworkshop. The interviews were intended to tap into the participants’: 1) self-efficacy inteaching academic integrity and professional ethics; 2) use of instructional strategiesbefore and after the workshop; 3) perceptions about the effectiveness of the workshop;and 4) experienced challenges in implementing curricula changes. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded using the inductive analysisapproach (Patton, 2002). Three major themes emerged from the analysis. First, theparticipants valued this professional development experience as it deepened their ownunderstanding of academic integrity and provided significant support as they restructuredtheir courses. One professor reflected that after implementing her new strategies, therewas a significant change in students’ perspectives on ethical issues: they became morereflective on the importance of academic integrity and revealed a deeper understanding ofprofessional ethics in their assignments. Second, while acknowledging the significance of the workshop, all participantsstruggled to incorporate academic integrity and professional ethics into their courses.Several obstacles were discussed during the interviews, such as limited class time thatcan be allotted for discussing academic integrity and lack of sufficient expertise to elicitfurther discussions about professional ethics. Furthermore, the faculty indicated the needfor further support in creating an ethical classroom. For instance, one professor, whilefeeling confident in teaching academic integrity in classrooms, suggested thatcollaborating with alumni may greatly help her promote students’ understanding ofprofessional ethics in the real world. Another professor, on the other hand, indicatedneeding further expert support in tailoring his course to cover academic integrity in moredepth. This study constituted our first step in facilitating the discussion of academicintegrity in engineering courses and supporting faculty members in preparing students forethical professional conducts. The data presented in this proposal is from the first year ofthis new initiative and we are now into our second year of offering the workshop. In thefinal paper, we will present more information about the workshop and details about thequalitative findings, as well as data from faculty who participated in the second-yearworkshop.ReferencePatton, M. Q. (2002). Qualitative research and evaluation methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Liu, S., & Zappe, S. E., & Mena, I. B., & Litzinger, T. A., & Hochstedt, K. S., & Bertram Gallant, T. (2015, June), Faculty Perspectives About Incorporating Academic Integrity into Engineering Courses Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24104

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2015 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015