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Faculty Reward System Reform For Advancement Of Professional Engineering Education For Innovation: Revisiting The Urgency For Reform

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Faculty Reward System Reform

Tagged Division

Graduate Studies

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

12.735.1 - 12.735.5

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1655

Download Count

27

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Paper Authors

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Dennis Depew Purdue University

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DENNIS R. DEPEW is dean of the college of technology, Purdue University.

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Gary Bertoline Purdue University

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GARY R. BERTOLINE is professor and assistant dean for graduate studies of the college of technology, Purdue University.

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Mark Schuver Purdue University

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MARK T. SCHUVER is director of the Rolls-Royce-Purdue Master’s degree program, Purdue University.

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Donald Keating University of South Carolina

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DONALD A. KEATING is associate professor of mechanical engineering, University of South Carolina, and chair ASEE-Graduate Studies Division.

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Thomas Stanford University of South Carolina

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THOMAS G. STANFORD is assistant professor of chemical engineering, University of South Carolina.

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Duane Dunlap Western Carolina University

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DUANE D. DUNLAP is professor, interim dean, Kimmel School, Western Carolina University, and
program chair ASEE-Graduate Studies Division.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Faculty Reward System Reform for Advancement of Professional Engineering Education for Innovation: Revisiting the Urgency for Reform

Introduction

This is the first of three invited papers prepared for a special panel session of the National Collaborative Task Force on Engineering Graduate Education Reform to enable a strong U.S. engineering workforce for competitiveness and national security. Initiated in 2000 by the ASEE- Graduate Studies Division, College Industry Partnership Division, and Corporate Members Council, the National Collaborative Task Force is a coalition of key leaders from innovative universities and industry who are working in a unique collaboration to respond to the urgency for reshaping the U.S. system of engineering graduate education to better serve the needs of modern engineering practice to strengthen the nation’s capability for technology development and innovation.

The National Collaborative is focusing on two primary questions: First, can an effective system of professional engineering graduate education be created in the United States for developing our engineering talent in industry so that the continuing future of engineering practice for creative technology development & innovation in this country may be assured for economic competitiveness and national security purposes? Second, how can this system of professional engineering graduate education be implemented across the United States using the combined resources of universities and industry to ensure world-class engineering leadership for innovation so that each state and region can prosper over the long-term?

This paper looks primarily at the second question as it seeks answers to how faculty will be rewarded in a system where teaching professionals is as important as research. The need for reform to design a new faculty reward system as a complement to the traditional research- oriented faculty reward system for advancement of professional engineering education for innovation is no longer in question. However, little has changed at most universities, with a few notable exceptions, across the nation. Today, leading universities must be more responsive to their multi-faceted missions and provide more engagement in the professions.

One major responsibility of the responsive university in the 21st century is advanced professional graduate education for the engineering profession. This responsibility includes the creation of an appropriate faculty reward system for professionally-oriented faculty within graduate centers who are helping to further educate the nation’s engineers as leaders, creators, and innovators of technological advancement in advanced engineering practice in industry. As the overview paper in this session, this first paper revisits the need for faculty reward reform for professionally- oriented faculty at the nation’s colleges of engineering and technology and sustains the vision for moving professional graduate education forward in the national interest to ensure a strong U.S. engineering workforce for competitiveness and national security purposes.

Depew, D., & Bertoline, G., & Schuver, M., & Keating, D., & Stanford, T., & Dunlap, D. (2007, June), Faculty Reward System Reform For Advancement Of Professional Engineering Education For Innovation: Revisiting The Urgency For Reform Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/1655

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