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Feedback-seeking Behaviors

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Understanding Student Behavior and Experiences

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

12

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34668

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/34668

Download Count

255

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Paper Authors

biography

Jeannine E. Turner Florida State University

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I am an Associate Professor in Learning and Cognition at Florida State University. My research focuses on understanding the interactions of engineering students' motivation, emotions, beliefs, self-regulation, and achievement.

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biography

Min Tang

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The research interests of mine are: 1) to understand teachers’ pedagogical practices and the potential effects of those practices on students’ critical thinking and epistemic beliefs in engineering domain, 2) to quantify epistemically-related emotions that occur during the epistemic activity, 3) to explore the best pedagogical practices to improve the efficiency integrating classroom project-based learning and students’ real-world problem-solving practice.

I have MS degree from Florida State University in Curriculum and Instruction and BA degree from China Nanchang University in English.

I speak English, Chinese, and some Japanese. I am a proactive person. If you are interested in my research topic, please feel free to contact me via email: mt14n@my.fsu.edu

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Shayne Kelly McConomy Florida A&M University/Florida State University

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Shayne K. McConomy is the Capstone Design Coordinator in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at FAMU-FSU College of Engineering; He holds a PhD in Automotive Engineering from Clemson University. His focus is product development and design for the automotive industry.

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Mostafa Papi

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Dr. Mostafa Papi is an Assistant Professor of Foreign and Second Language Education in the School of Teacher Education. His research focuses on the role of motivation and personality on different aspects of second language learning including, but not limited to, learners’ cognitive engagement in the learning process, their perceptions of and response to oral and written corrective feedback, their linguistic, emotional, behavioral and learning characteristics and strategies, and their task preferences.

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Jerris Hooker Florida A&M University/Florida State University

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Jerris Hooker received his Bachelor’s degree from Florida State University followed by a Master’s degree and PhD from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. After completing his PhD, he spent the next few years at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory as a Postdoctoral Researcher. His research there was focused on developing new technology for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using superconducting materials. Currently he serves as a teaching faculty member in the department of electrical and computer engineering at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering as the capstone design project coordinator.

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Abstract

This paper is an exploratory study on students’ beliefs and feedback-seeking behaviors. Students believe that developing their engineering-identity involves cultivating their technical skills and they rely on feedback to provide competence-information with respect to engineering work. Unfortunately, obtaining feedback can have negative cognitive, emotional, and motivational costs, such as when students doubt their skills, feel shame, and lack motivation to proceed. This presents a dilemma; if engineering students seek feedback and experience shame, they may have maladaptive responses, including dropping out. We collected data from 133 junior-level mechanical (n=93) and electrical (n=40) engineering-students, taking their initial engineering-design classes for their (1) beliefs about engineering intelligence (fixed/growth mindsets), (2) perceptions of cost/benefits for seeking feedback, and (3) feedback-seeking behaviors (indirect feedback-monitoring, direct from instructors/peers). Results suggested that, when students have a growth mindset and value feedback, they perceive feedback as a learning resource that they seek, either directly or indirectly. Engineering students’ who associated feedback with negative costs, do not invest in feedback-seeking behaviors. These students may see feedback-seeking as hindering their ability to maintain good impressions, and thus, they are less motivated to risk their self-presentations.

Turner, J. E., & Tang, M., & McConomy, S. K., & Papi, M., & Hooker, J. (2020, June), Feedback-seeking Behaviors Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34668

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