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Finite Element Analysis For The Engineering Sciences: A Web Based, Video Streamed Education Environment At A Distance

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Conference

1999 Annual Conference

Location

Charlotte, North Carolina

Publication Date

June 20, 1999

Start Date

June 20, 1999

End Date

June 23, 1999

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

25

Page Numbers

4.268.1 - 4.268.25

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7677

Download Count

63

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Paper Authors

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Z. Chambers

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M. B. Taylor

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A. J. Baker

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 3220

Finite Element Analysis for the Engineering Sciences: A Web-Based, Video-Streamed Education Environment at a Distance

A.J. Baker, Z. Chambers and M.B. Taylor University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37996-2030

Abstract

Finite element theory, and associated codes, forms the backbone of most computer-based simulation methods for analysis and design of engineered systems, ranging from structures to fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and coupled systems. Herein is described the organization and content of the Internet offering of this pertinent first-level graduate course. It presents full details on the pedagogical and technical innovations and investments required created, or reduced to practice, to enable the necessary functionalities. The local and remote hardware environment requirements are detailed, each constituted of no more than respectable PCs with adequate soundcard and free software. The website at http://cfdlab.engr.utk.edu contains full information.

Introduction

Finite element theory constitutes the fundamental support for the wide range of computational theories applicable to analysis and design of engineered systems, ranging from structures to fluid mechanics, heat transfer, electromagnetics, i.e., computational continuum mechanics. The Engineering Science program at UTK has developed and taught the first level graduate course in this area, specifically tailored for students majoring in computational mechanics. It has proven highly useful as well in addressing students across engineering disciplines, and the natural sciences, with an interest in using scientific simulation in thesis or dissertation projects.

Developing a hands-on practical computing environment has been a course focus, with software system growth leading to ever broader applications capability. One outcome of this process was the introductory textbook Finite Elements 1-2-31, published in 1991 and containing a PC code on a 5.25” floppy disc (how ancient!). Developments since then have led to utilization of matrix manipulation packages, e.g., MATLAB2, to convert theory to practice in a much more transparent venue. Reporting course computational lab results has similarly transcended from paper to html, admitting full results documentation in color and on-line.

The emergence of the Internet, and in particular high performance communications, has opened the opportunity to move this instruction process into the web venue, with appropriately developed, specifically designed courseware (replacing the traditional textbook) and computing software. For the first time, in fall semester 1998, Finite Elements for the Engineering Sciences was offered as a live, video-streamed graduate level lecture course over the Web, complete with the full compliment of supporting lecture/laboratory materials. The web site (http://cfdlab.engr.utk.edu/551w) was specifically designed and developed to support

Chambers, Z., & Taylor, M. B., & Baker, A. J. (1999, June), Finite Element Analysis For The Engineering Sciences: A Web Based, Video Streamed Education Environment At A Distance Paper presented at 1999 Annual Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina. https://peer.asee.org/7677

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