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“Flipping” The Classroom To Explore Active Learning In A Large Undergraduate Course

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Classroom Engagement

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

21

Page Numbers

14.1385.1 - 14.1385.21

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4545

Download Count

1001

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Paper Authors

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Sarah Zappe Pennsylvania State University

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Dr. Sarah Zappe is the Director of Assessment and Instructional Support in the Leonhard Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Education at Pennsylvania State University. Her background is in educational psychology with an emphasis on educational testing and assessment. She can be reached at ser163@psu.edu.

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Robert Leicht Pennsylvania State University

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Robert is currently a PhD Candidate in the Architectural Engineering Department at Penn State. Robert’s research focuses on the improvement of team collaboration while leveraging advanced data modeling and visualization technologies for building design and construction. Robert earned his Masters in Architectural Engineering at Penn State, as well as having a background in the construction industry. In addition, Robert has also spend time working with VTT, the Technical Research Center of Finland, as a visiting scholar with their Building Informatics team. Robert’s interest in Multi-Media educational methods has grown through his research into improving team collaboration through improved communication technology. He can be reached at rml167@psu.edu.

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John Messner Pennsylvania State University

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Dr. John Messner is an Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering and the Director of the Computer Integrated Construction Research Program at Penn State. He teaches courses in construction engineering and management; Building Information Modeling; and virtual prototyping. He recently led a project to construct the Immersive Construction (ICon) Lab, an affordable, 3 screen immersive display system for design and construction visualization, and is developing an interactive virtual construction simulation application for engineering education. He can be reached at jim101@psu.edu.

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Thomas Litzinger Pennsylvania State University

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Tom Litzinger is Director of the Leonhard Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Education
and a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Penn State, where he has been on the faculty since 1985. His work in engineering education involves curricular reform, teaching and learning
innovations, faculty development, and assessment. He teaches and conducts research in the areas of combustion and thermal sciences. He was selected as a Fellow of ASEE in 2008. He can be reached at tal2@psu.edu.

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Hyeon Woo Lee Pennsylvania State University

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Hyeon Woo Lee is an assistant professor at Department of Education, Sangmyung University in Seoul Korea. His research interests are instructional systems design, new technology integration, and social networking in virtual world.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

“Flipping” the Classroom to Explore Active Learning in a Large Undergraduate Course Key Words: active learning, teaching with technology, e-learning

Abstract

In traditional approaches to teaching engineering classes, the instructor plays the role of information conveyor, while the students assume a receiver role with primary responsibilities of listening and note-taking. Research into how students learn suggests that students need to be more actively engaged with the course material to maximize their understanding. The literature contains many examples of active learning strategies, such as teams solving problems in class and the use of student response systems with conceptual questions. Incorporating active learning strategies into a class means that there will be less time for delivering material via lecture. Therefore, instructors who choose to utilize active learning strategies must find ways to ensure that all required course content is still addressed.

This paper discusses an instructional technique called the “classroom flip” model which was assessed in a larger, undergraduate architectural engineering class. In this model, lecture content is removed from the classroom to allow time for active learning, and the content that was removed is delivered to students via on-line video. This approach ‘flips’ the traditional use of lecture and more active learning approaches. Lecture occurs outside of class, and more active learning, such as problem solving, happens during class. Assessment data was collected to examine students’ use of the video lectures and perceptions of the classroom flip. The students’ feedback suggests that while the active learning and additional project time available in class improved their understanding, they would prefer that only about half the classes be flipped and some use of traditional lectures should be maintained.

Introduction

Engineering instructors are often encouraged to try instructional techniques that encourage their students to be more actively engaged with course material. Active learning is defined by the engineering education community as the “involvement of students in their own learning.”1 Active learning encompasses a variety of instructional techniques, in which students participate in activities during class time that involve more than passive listening. Active learning techniques include in-class group work, think-pair-share, “clicker” questions using student response systems, and minute papers.

Active learning is necessary in order to increase understanding and for enhancing problem solving skills. The National Research Council has stated that “…the new science of learning is beginning to provide knowledge to improve significantly people’s abilities to become active learners who seek to understand complex subject matter and are better prepared to transfer what they have learned to new problems and settings” (p. 13) 2 However, many instructors still utilize class time for lecture and are concerned that active learning consumes valuable time that is needed to cover material. The lecture method is often used as the primary method to make sure

Zappe, S., & Leicht, R., & Messner, J., & Litzinger, T., & Lee, H. W. (2009, June), “Flipping” The Classroom To Explore Active Learning In A Large Undergraduate Course Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/4545

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