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Freshman Engineering Living Learning Communities At Virginia Tech

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

FPD2 -- Highlighting First-Year Programs

Tagged Division

First-Year Programs

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

12.763.1 - 12.763.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2769

Download Count

251

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Paper Authors

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Jean Kampe Virginia Tech

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J.C. MALZAHN KAMPE is an associate professor in the Department of Engineering Education at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. She received her Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Michigan Technological University, her M.Ch.E. in chemical engineering from the University of Delaware, and her B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Michigan Technological University.

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Whitney Edmister Virginia Tech

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WHITNEY A. EDMISTER is the Assistant Director of the Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Diversity at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. She received her M.S. in Counselor Education, Student Affairs Administration from Radford University, and M.S. in Career and Technical Education and B.S. in Human Nutrition, Foods and Exercise both from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

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Matthew Stimpson Virginia Tech

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MATTHEW STIMPSON is a doctoral student in the Higher Education program in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Virginia Tech. He is also a graduate assistant in the Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Diversity, also at Virginia Tech. He holds a M.Ed. in Higher Education Administration and a B.A. in political science, both from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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Brad Matanin Virginia Tech

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BRAD M. MATANIN is a graduate teaching assistant in the Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Diversity at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech). He helps teach and coordinate the Galileo seminar course. He received his B.S. in Biological Systems Engineering fromm Virginia Tech and is currently pursuing an M.S. in Biological Systems Engineering with a concentration in biopharmaceutical processing.

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Amanda Martin Virginia Tech

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AMANDA M. MARTIN is a graduate teaching assistant in the Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Diversity at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Martin received her B.S. and M.S. in Biological Systems Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in '04/'07. Martin is the director of the Second Year Hypatia Program.

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Cory Brozina Virginia Tech

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CORY BROZINA is a graduate assistant with the College of Engineering and the Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Diversity (CEED). He is the Data Manager and the Director of Imagination for the CEED office. He is in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department obtaining his Masters in Management Systems.

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Bevlee Watford Virginia Tech

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DR. BEVLEE A. WATFORD, P.E. is the founding Director of the Center for the Enhancement of Engineering Diversity, established in 1992. Watford received the ASEE 2003 Minorities in Engineering award due to her efforts to increase the recruitment, retention, and graduation rates of under-represented students in engineering. She is currently working for the National Science Foundation as a rotator in the Division of Undergraduate Education.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Freshman Engineering Living-Learning Communities at Virginia Tech

Abstract

Living-learning communities have been a part of higher education for many years. Research indicates that students who participate in living-learning communities report a more favorable college experience and are more likely to persist to graduation, to report fewer social problems, and to perform better academically. At Virginia Tech, there are currently two living- learning communities for freshman engineering students. Hypatia, now in its sixth year, currently houses 75 freshman women, and Galileo, in only its second year, houses 180 men. Of our fall 2006 incoming class (186 women and 1040 men), these programs serve 40% of the women and about 17% of the men. This paper presents our experience with engineering students who choose this type of on-campus living arrangement, including our findings on residents’ academic performance and persistence as compared to non-participating matching cohorts. We will also provide demographics of the residents, details on the required fall companion seminar course and the optional spring programming activities, and an overview of the challenges and successes of implementing a rather large living-learning community (Galileo) in the residence halls of a large university. Survey results on motivations to participate and on program satisfaction will be provided. Presented results will be offered in terms of the separate male and female communities, and in combined form when appropriate, so that distinctions between the communities can be noted and preserved.

Introduction

Learning Communities have long been part of higher education’s approaches to academic enrichment, and they have taken on many forms and versions as the years have passed.1-5 Such programs that have a residential component are typically called Living-Learning Communities, or LLCs, and usually involve housing the participants in the same residence hall or portion of a residence hall. The Experimental College, established at the University of Wisconsin in1927 by Alexander Meiklejohn and the first formally established learning community in higher education, was, in fact, a living-learning community that occupied a portion of Adams Hall for men.1 Today, the structure of learning communities, and the influence of structure on expected outcomes, is of great interest.2, 3 And, the flexibility in that structure to adapt to different implementations is recognized as a great strength of learning communities,5 allowing design for specific expected outcomes (e.g., diversity6). Perhaps one of the best testimonies to the formidable hold that learning communities, and living-learning communities in particular, have established in the reform of higher education is the Academic Village which is slated to open in fall 2007 at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado. The Village is a new facility that is to function as residential space for engineering students (~250) and faculty, and also is to contain College of Engineering faculty offices, classrooms, and laboratory space, and university dining facilities.7, 8 The current prevalence of “living learning communities” is easily made evident with a Google search on that combination of words, which pulls up a huge number of links to college campus initiatives across the United States and beyond. With such a web search,

Kampe, J., & Edmister, W., & Stimpson, M., & Matanin, B., & Martin, A., & Brozina, C., & Watford, B. (2007, June), Freshman Engineering Living Learning Communities At Virginia Tech Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2769

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2007 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015