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From Faculty to Change Agent: Lessons Learned in the Development and Implementation of a Change Workshop

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engineering Leadership Development Constituent Committee Division Technical Session 1

Tagged Division

Engineering Leadership Development Division

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

24.630.1 - 24.630.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/20521

Download Count

30

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Paper Authors

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Ella Lee Ingram Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Ella L. Ingram is an Associate Professor of Applied Biology and Biomedical Engineering and Director of the Center for the Practice and Scholarship of Education at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Her educational research interests include promoting successful change practice of STEM faculty, effective evolution and ecology instruction, and facilitating undergraduate research experiences. Her teaching portfolio includes courses on: nutrition, introductory biology, ecology and environmental studies, evolution, evolutionary medicine, and research practices in science.

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Richard A. House Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Richard House is Professor of English at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. He received a B.A. from Illinois Wesleyan University and M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine. In addition to engineering communication and pedagogy, he has scholarly interests in sustainability and Shakespeare.

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Steve Chenoweth Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Steve Chenoweth is Associate Professor of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Previously he had a career in software development, at NCR Corp. and at Bell Labs. He specialized in starting new projects, and in reviewing such projects. All of these software development projects involved some associated social change. At Rose-Hulman he has been involved in starting the bachelor's and master's programs in software engineering.

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Kay C. Dee Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Kay C Dee received a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and M.Eng. and Ph.D. degrees in biomedical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. After completing her graduate work, Kay C joined the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, and later joined the faculty at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. She served as the founding Director of the Rose-Hulman Center for the Practice and Scholarship of Education, and is currently the Associate Dean of Learning & Technology as well as a founding member of the team that annually delivers Rose-Hulman's 'Making Academic Change Happen' workshop.

Kay C has received a number of awards for teaching, research, and mentoring, including the Louisiana "Professor of the Year" award from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, the Tulane University “Inspirational Undergraduate Professor” award; the Tulane University President’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching; the Graduate Alliance for Education in Louisiana Award for Excellence in Mentoring Minority Researchers; the honor to serve as a Teaching Fellow for the National Effective Teaching Institute; and more.

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Jameel Ahmed Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Jameel Ahmed is Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Applied Biology and Biomedical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. He has been teaching at Rose-Hulman since 1999, and his technical interests lie in the areas of quantitative physiology and neuroprosthetics. He also has interest in helping develop leadership skills in others, as is evidenced by his involvement in Rose-Hulman's Leadership Advancement Program, and the Making Academic Change Happen (MACH) workshop

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Julia M. Williams Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Dr. Julia M. Williams is Executive Director of the Office of Institutional Research, Planning, and Assessment & Professor of English at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Her research areas include technical communication, assessment, accreditation, and the impact of pen-based technologies on learning and
teaching. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Engineering Education, International Journal of Engineering Education, IEEE Transaction on Professional Communication, and Technical Communication Quarterly, among others.

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Craig G. Downing Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Craig G. Downing is Department Head and Associate Professor of Engineering Management at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. His teaching responsibilities are focused on delivering graduate-level instruction related to Operations and Quality Systems. His interests are rooted in Academic-Industrial partnerships, Process Improvement, and Action Research in Engineering Management. He is a certified Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt.

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Donald E. Richards Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Abstract

From Faculty to Change Agent: Lessons Learned in the Development and Implementation of a Change WorkshopChange is hard. Changes affect the status quo, but done well will incorporate innovation.Agents of change face opposition from multiple angles, yet see opportunity in unexploredcorners. In the face of these conflicting forces, making change happen is challenging, yetnecessary. For higher education, pressures are mounting: the global economy is uncertainand dynamic, intellectual content is widely accessible, institutional costs are rising, andalternatives to a traditional degree are growing. In this paper, we describe the evolution ofthe Making Academic Change Happen (MACH) workshop, in which participants - futurechange agents - learn change strategies, develop skills, build a community, and create anaction plan. The objective of this work is to present lessons the facilitator team learnedabout successful change strategies through workshop preparation and working withparticipants. A secondary objective of this work is to suggest key resources and strategiesfor developing change skills that can be adopted by individuals on their home campus.The fundamental learning outcome of our workshop planning and development processwas the realization that becoming a change agent requires the acquisition of skills outsidethe realm of typical experience for faculty members - strategic thinking, creating workingpartnerships, garnering support for far reaching ideas, team management, etc. To besuccessful, faculty must intentionally learn these skills and practice them in advance oftheir deployment. As a result, MACH is a manifestation of the philosophy “you have todo it to know it” (i.e., practice and feedback help develop mastery). Second, a majorlesson from the change literature and from projects developed at the workshop is thatchange doesn’t always depend on funding, especially not new money. Having funding fora project might accelerate change, but understanding the institutional context can be farmore important to successful implementation. For this reason, MACH participants workon their own individual/team projects, applying lessons in each workshop session to arelevant scenario as it would likely play out on their campus. Additional MACH lessonslearned will be described, using examples from five implementations of the workshopmaterials. While we think the in-person MACH experience is invaluable for supportingchange process, we have identified and will share key resources that individuals canutilize on their own. These resources are readily available, inexpensive, and outside therealm of typical faculty development, making them essential in the process of becoming achange agent.

Ingram, E. L., & House, R. A., & Chenoweth, S., & Dee, K. C., & Ahmed, J., & Williams, J. M., & Downing, C. G., & Richards, D. E. (2014, June), From Faculty to Change Agent: Lessons Learned in the Development and Implementation of a Change Workshop Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. https://peer.asee.org/20521

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