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From Henry V To Starman: Linking The Humanities And Social Sciences To Engineering

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Integrating H&SS in Engineering II

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

10.650.1 - 10.650.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/14786

Download Count

12

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Paper Authors

author page

Kenneth Hunter

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

From Henry V to Starman: Linking the Humanities and Social Sciences to Engineering

Kenneth W. Hunter, Sr., P.E. Tennessee Technological University

Abstract

ABET criteria require engineering programs to demonstrate that their graduates have, among other things, “the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context” and “a knowledge of contemporary issues.” These outcomes are usually addressed with curriculum requirements for courses in the humanities and social sciences. However, without additional mechanisms for making a connection between these courses and the engineering profession, it is doubtful that most students will fully realize the relevance and value of the material.

This paper describes efforts to link the humanities and social sciences to traditional engineering courses through the use of brief vignettes based on historical events, plays, songs, movies, and other forms of art. The vignettes are chosen to introduce or highlight selected engineering topics and/or demonstrate the impact of engineering on individuals and/or society. In addition to helping students understand the relevance of the humanities and social sciences in their work as engineers, the vignettes can also serve to demonstrate real world applications of engineering principles, increase the appeal of the engineering profession for some students, provide active learning opportunities, promote efficient use of instructional time, and add an element of fun to the classroom. Examples based on the movie Starman, Shakespeare’s play Henry V, and the song The Wreck of the Old 97 are included.

Introduction

ABET criteria require engineering programs to demonstrate that their graduates have, among other things, “the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context” and “a knowledge of contemporary issues.”1 These outcomes are usually addressed with curriculum requirements for courses in the humanities and social sciences. However, without additional mechanisms for making a connection between these courses and the engineering profession, it is doubtful that most students will fully realize the relevance and value of the material.

For more than fifty years, numerous works by leading engineering educators have proposed the integration of engineering with the humanities and social sciences as a means of improving engineering education.2 And while a number of successful programs have been developed, many of them have only been offered as curriculum options or limited only to honors students. Few programs exist that impact large numbers of mainstream engineering students. There are also numerous impediments to the integration of engineering with the humanities and social sciences,

Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education

Hunter, K. (2005, June), From Henry V To Starman: Linking The Humanities And Social Sciences To Engineering Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/14786

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