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Game Effectiveness of Power Ville in Promoting Science and Engineering Design

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Conference

2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Atlanta, Georgia

Publication Date

June 23, 2013

Start Date

June 23, 2013

End Date

June 26, 2013

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

23.632.1 - 23.632.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/19646

Download Count

23

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Paper Authors

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Ying Tang Rowan University

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Dr. Ying Tang received B.S. and M.S. degrees from Northeastern University in P. R. China, in 1996 and 1998, respectively. She earned a Ph.D. degree from New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark, N.J. in 2001. She is currently an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Rowan University. Her research interests include virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and modeling and scheduling of computer-integrated systems. Dr. Tang has led or participated in several research and education projects funded by the National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Transportation, U.S. Navy, the Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh Foundation, the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation, and industry firms. Her work has resulted in more than 80 journal and conference papers and book chapters. Dr. Tang is very active in adapting and developing pedagogical methods and materials to enhance engineering education. Her most recent educational research includes collaboration with Tennessee State University and local high schools to infuse cyber-infrastructure learning experience into the pre-engineering and technology-based classrooms, and the collaboration with community colleges to develop interactive games in empowering students with engineering literacy and problem-solving.

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Sachin Shetty Tennessee State University

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Dr. Sachin Shetty is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Tennessee State University. He received his Ph.D. in Modeling and Simulation from Old Dominion University in 2007. His research interests lie at the intersection of computer networking, network security and machine learning. Recently, he has been working on security issues in cloud computing, cognitive radio networks, and wireless sensor networks. Over the years, he has secured funding over $3 million from NSF, AFOSR, DOE, DHS, TBR and local industry for research and educational innovations. He has authored and co-authored over 40 technical refereed and non-refereed papers in various conferences, international journal articles, book chapters in research and pedagogical techniques. He is the director of the Cyber Defense and Security Visualization Laboratory.

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Kauser Jahan Rowan University

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John P Henry Sustainable Learning Systems

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Currently, Mr. John Henry works with NJ School Board Association as a STEM and Sustainability consultant. Mr. Henry holds a master's degree in Industrial Studies and Technology Education and served fourteen years in public education. In 1981 he was a grant recipient of a two-year Research & Development Grant in Solar Energy from the US Department of Energy. From 2000 to 2003, he was a lead trainer for project InSTEP™ (Integrating Strategies and Technology in Education Practice), a U.S. Department of Education program featuring Problem Based Learning at NASA’s Classroom of the Future in West Virginia. During his fourteen years in the classroom, he co-authored the NASA Explorer Schools grant for Woodbury High School in NJ and served as the team leader for the program. He coordinated an electric vehicle program at Woodbury HS that participated in the Tour de Sol, an alternative-powered transportation race. In 2002 he was N.J.’s Technologist of the Year and Radio Shack’s National Teacher in Math, Science, and Technology. Mr. Henry was selected to participate in the Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship program and worked at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C. Mr. Henry served on the N.J. chapter US Green Building Council Board of Directors from 2006 to 2008 and is currently serving as the NJ Chapter Green Schools Advocate. He has served on the advisory board for “Engineering our Future New Jersey” at Stevens Institute of Technology and is currently serving as the co-principal investigator for a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant through Rowan University in game effectiveness promoting Science and Engineering Design.

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S. Keith Hargrove Tennessee State University

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Dr. S. Keith Hargrove currently serves as professor of Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering and Dean of the College of Engineering at Tennessee State University (TSU). He received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from TSU, his M.S. from the Missouri University of Science & Technology in Rolla, MO., and his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. He has worked for General Electric, Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, NIST, Oak Ridge Laboratories, and General Motors. Dr. Hargrove has conducted research projects with Sikorsky Aircraft, Boeing, NASA, and the US Army in systems engineering, design, and manufacturing. He is an associate member of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, Institute of Industrial Engineers, ASEE, and the Tennessee Society of Professional Engineers. His current research interests are in virtual and augmented reality, advanced manufacturing systems, systems engineering and management, and minority engineering education.

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Talbot Bielefeldt International Society for Technology in Education

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Mr. Bielefeldt is a senior research associate at the International Society for Technology in Education. His principal work focuses on evaluation of educational technology initiatives in K-12 educational settings. His recent studies have included projects funded under a variety of U.S. Department of Education, National Science Foundation, and private-sector programs. Mr. Bielefeldt holds a master's degree in Educational Policy and Management from the University of Oregon.

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Abstract

Game Effectiveness in Promoting Science and Engineering DesignABSTRACTThe radical and transformative technological revolution has resulted in fundamentally new ways of scienceand engineering practice. This paradigm shift has a significant impact on the skills needed for a diversescience and engineering workforce that is capable of designing and deploying cyber-based systems, tools andservices. However, engineering and science education has not kept pace with this evolution, especially at theK-12 level. This paper presents an approach that infuses cyberinfrastructure (CI) learning experiences intopre-engineering curriculum, particularly, the project-lead-the-way (PLTW), through a series of virtual realitygames in a given context like “Sustain City”. Two of the games, Power Ville and Gridlock, are developed andimplemented at two participating schools.Cooking a dinner, heating a house, lighting a street, and running a factory - all of these need power. Energyis thus at the heart of everybody’s quality of life. How to generate and use energy that satisfies increasingenergy needs while combating climate changes at the same time becomes an unprecedented challenge for asustainable city development. The core of Power Ville is to bring such real science and engineering designproblem as well as involved societal and environmental issues into PLTW curriculum. In fall 2011, thegame was piloted in Principles of Engineering (POE) course at Burlington County Institute of Technology –a vocational school in New Jersey. One focus of POE is types of energy (non-renewable and renewable) andenergy distribution.Automatic traffic light is a typical engineering invention that made the lives of common people safer andmore convenient. For the development of the future Sustain City, its design inevitably appears in the agendaof the city master plan. Gridlock is such a game that involves students to deal with those essential tasks. InSpring 2012, the game was piloted in Digital Electronics (DE) course at Bridgeton High School – a publicschool in New Jersey. The focus of DE is digital logic design.Together with the implementation, a thorough evaluation plan is conducted as well to help investigatorsanswer three important questions as listed below. This paper reports the findings of this assessment as for theanswers to the following questions. • Did the games expose sufficient CI content? • If so, did students in classrooms that used the games exhibit higher interests in engineering problem- solving? • If so, was the student learning in general improved by the gaming experiences?

Tang, Y., & Shetty, S., & Jahan, K., & Henry, J. P., & Hargrove, S. K., & Bielefeldt, T. (2013, June), Game Effectiveness of Power Ville in Promoting Science and Engineering Design Paper presented at 2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. https://peer.asee.org/19646

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