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Generating Coupled Multiple Response Questions to Assess Student Understanding of Newton’s Second Law

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Conference

2021 ASEE Pacific Southwest Conference - "Pushing Past Pandemic Pedagogy: Learning from Disruption"

Location

Virtual

Publication Date

April 23, 2021

Start Date

April 23, 2021

End Date

April 25, 2021

Page Count

13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/38232

Download Count

15

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Paper Authors

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Maggie Nevrly California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo

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Maggie Nevrly is a fourth-year student at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering expecting to graduate in June 2021. She enjoys working as a learning assistant for the Department of Mechanical Engineering at California Polytechnic State University since January 2020. In this role, she assists student learning in undergraduate dynamics and statics classes with difficult mechanics concepts. She also participates in research to include social justice topics in a mechanical systems design course.

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Megan Nicole Phillips California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Megan Phillips is a fourth-year student at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering with a concentration in Mechanical Design. She is minoring in German and Entrepreneurship and expects to graduate in March 2022. She has been working as a learning assistant for the Department of Mechanical Engineering at California Polytechnic State University since September 2019, where she works to assist student learning in undergraduate dynamics classes and participates in research to improve student understanding of complex dynamics concepts.

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Eileen W. Rossman P.E. California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Eileen Rossman has a worked in various industries for over 14 years before starting a career teaching engineering. Here industry experience includes field support for Navy Nuclear refueling with Westinghouse, analysis and programming of pipeline flow solutions with Stoner Associates, and design of elevator structures and drive components with Schindler Elevator.

Since 2002, Eileen has taught in the Mechanical Engineering Department at California Polytechnic State University. Her teaching experience includes Basic and Intermediate Fluids, Basic and Intermediate Dynamics, Statics, Machine Design, and Thermal Measurements.

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Brian P. Self California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Brian Self obtained his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Engineering Mechanics from Virginia Tech, and his Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the University of Utah. He worked in the Air Force Research Laboratories before teaching at the U.S. Air Force Academy for seven years. Brian has taught in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo since 2006. During the 2011-2012 academic year he participated in a professor exchange, teaching at the Munich University of Applied Sciences. His engineering education interests include collaborating on the Dynamics Concept Inventory, developing model-eliciting activities in mechanical engineering courses, inquiry-based learning in mechanics, and design projects to help promote adapted physical activities. Other professional interests include aviation physiology and biomechanics.

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Michaella Ochotorena California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Nathalia De Souza California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Abstract

It is difficult to get at the root of a student’s misunderstanding with a multiple-choice question, but more effective free response questions take significantly longer to process. In coupled multiple response questions (CMRs), students select an answer they believe to be correct to a multiple-choice question; then, in a follow-up question paired to their initial response, students select a reason why they believe that to be the correct answer. In this way, students can then be directed to interventions that are aimed at their specific misconceptions. It is important that the choices in the follow-up question are authentic distractors such that they pin-point particular student alternate conceptions. In this paper, we describe our efforts to create CMR tests to prepare for the pulley inquiry-based learning activity (IBLA) to assess student understanding of Newton’s Second Law. We will be analyzing answers provided by undergraduate Dynamics students to free response questions given prior to participating in this IBLA. We plan to identify reasoning patterns through an in vivo coding process using the qualitative research software Dedoose. These reasoning patterns result in the development of answers for the pulley activity’s CMR that connotate varying level of understanding such that the instructor can identify the source of the misconception and plan their classroom activities accordingly. Developed answers can then be vetted through other experts and professionals based on their current understanding of student misconceptions. This process can be used by instructors for the development of further online activities and adaptive learning modules. The CMRs will be formed in winter and tested on students in an undergraduate Dynamic class.

Nevrly, M., & Phillips, M. N., & Rossman, E. W., & Self, B. P., & Ochotorena, M., & De Souza, N. (2021, April), Generating Coupled Multiple Response Questions to Assess Student Understanding of Newton’s Second Law Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Pacific Southwest Conference - "Pushing Past Pandemic Pedagogy: Learning from Disruption", Virtual. https://peer.asee.org/38232

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