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Girls In Science, Engineering, And Technology (Giset)

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Emerging Trends in Engineering Education Poster Session

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

10.667.1 - 10.667.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/14259

Download Count

45

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Paper Authors

author page

Rasha Morsi

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Girls In Science, Engineering, and Technology (GISET)

Rasha Morsi, Ph.D.

Norfolk State University

Abstract

While the proportion of women earning bachelor’s degrees in science and engineering (S&E) has increased, the proportion remains significantly lower than that of women earning bachelor’s degrees in non-scientific areas, indicating a critical need for additional retention and recruiting techniques specifically for minority females. In the last few decades, recruiting of minority females has been a challenge to say the least. At Norfolk State University, the student population is 88% African American, 64% of this population is female, yet there is a disproportionately small percentage of African-American female students majoring in the Science, Engineering, and Technology (SET) fields (0.22% Engineering, 0.50% Technology, and 1.98% Computer Science). Revised retention and recruitment techniques were needed for these SET majors among others. The Girls in Science, Engineering, and Technology (GISET) is a newly founded club at NSU with the main purpose of retaining currently enrolled SET female students and recruiting more female students from the immediate community as well as nationwide.

Background

While the proportion of women earning bachelor’s degrees in science and engineering (S&E) has increased, the proportion remains significantly lower than that of women earning bachelor’s degrees in non-scientific areas, indicating a critical need for additional research into the reason behind this discrepancy. Not surprisingly, women also remain significantly underrepresented in the total S&E workforce, especially when compared with their presence in the total labor force or in the college-educated labor force [1].

“Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education”

Morsi, R. (2005, June), Girls In Science, Engineering, And Technology (Giset) Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/14259

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