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Great Environments For Student Success

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Issues and Directions in ET Education & Administration: Part III

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

15.632.1 - 15.632.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15737

Download Count

28

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Paper Authors

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Stephen Hundley Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis

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Stephen Hundley is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Undergraduate Programs in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI.

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Terri Talbert-Hatch Indiana University

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Terri Talbert-Hatch is Assistant Dean for Student Services in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI.

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Adrie Koehler Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis

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Adrie Koehler is a graduate student in the M.S. Technology program in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI.

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Damon Hathaway Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

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Damon Hathaway is an undergraduate student in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI.

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Kelly Keelen Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

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Kelly Keelen is Administrative Coordinator of Academic Programs in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

GREAT Environments for Student Success Abstract

GREAT is an acronym that stands for Graduate, Retain, Engage, Admit, and Tell. It is an organizing framework that reverse-engineers the process of how students interact with our school. By beginning with the end in mind and working backward, the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) was able to identify value-creating activities and efficient processes that have a direct and indirect impact on student success in engineering and technology.

The premise for GREAT acknowledges that many of our stakeholders (e.g. students; parents; policymakers; employers) expect us to graduate students in a timely manner for success in a variety of post-degree roles. To do this, we must first retain students in our programs to degree completion. Because retention is an outcome of engagement, we need to engage students through relevant in-class, online, and co-curricular experiences; powerful pedagogies and high-impact educational practices; and meaningful relationships with peers, faculty and staff members, and our business/industry, government, and community partners. In order to ensure student success and to meet the needs of a changing marketplace, we must admit better-prepared and more diverse students to our programs. This requires all of us to be able to tell prospective students and other stakeholders about the value our programs offer them. Finally, to tell the story persuasively, we need to answer this question: “What value are we creating for students who choose to attend our school, and to what extent is this value differentiated from other institutions or departments offering similar programs?”

The GREAT Environments Task Force placed an emphasis on practices and activities that impact student graduation from our programs. Specific activities were inventoried, analyzed, and evaluated based on the utility and effectiveness of various parts of the process that lead to desired results. The Task Force communicated to and involved other school stakeholders in its important work. Key outcomes included strategies and recommendations to guide implementation efforts to maintain, enhance, or improve school-based activities that contribute to student success.

This paper describes the purposes, processes, and perspectives associated with this planning and improvement initiative. Each component of GREAT will be explained, and examples of best practices and indicators of performance will be identified. How to involve stakeholders in a deliberative, representative, and evidence-based approach to determining present activities and comparing them to best practices on-campus and elsewhere will be discussed. Finally, issues to consider in replicating GREAT Environments in other engineering and technology contexts will be shared.

Introduction

In the GREAT Environments structure, five important components are considered with the ultimate goal of creating a meaningful and effective college experience for all students. Each element of the framework is meant to evaluate important moments in the college progression and build off one another to move students through college in a timely manner.

Hundley, S., & Talbert-Hatch, T., & Koehler, A., & Hathaway, D., & Keelen, K. (2010, June), Great Environments For Student Success Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/15737

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