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Growing Experimental Centric Learning: The Role of Setting and Instructional Use in Building Student Outcomes

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Trends in ECE Education II

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

15

DOI

10.18260/p.25427

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/25427

Download Count

99

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Paper Authors

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Yacob Astatke Morgan State University

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Dr. Yacob Astatke completed both his Doctor of Engineering and B.S.E.E. degrees from Morgan State University (MSU) and his M.S.E.E. from Johns Hopkins University. He has been a full time faculty member in the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) department at MSU since August 1994 and currently serves as the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the School of Engineering. Dr. Astatke is the winner of the 2013
American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) “National Outstanding Teaching Award," and the 2012 ASEE Mid-Atlantic Region "Distinguished Teacher" Award. He teaches courses in both analog and digital electronic circuit design and instrumentation, with a focus on wireless communication. He has more than 15 years experience in the development and delivery of synchronous and asynchronous web-based course supplements for electrical engineering courses. Dr. Astatke played a leading role in the development and implementation of the first completely online undergraduate ECE program in the State of Maryland. He has published over 50 papers and presented his research work at regional, national and international conferences. He also runs several exciting summer camps geared towards middle school, high school, and community college students to expose and increase their interest in pursuing Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields. Dr. Astatke travels to Ethiopia every summer to provide training and guest lectures related to the use of the mobile laboratory technology and pedagogy to enhance the ECE curriculum at five different universities.

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Kenneth A Connor Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

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Kenneth Connor is a professor in the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (ECSE) where he teaches courses on electromagnetics, electronics and instrumentation, plasma physics, electric power, and general engineering. His research involves plasma physics, electromagnetics, photonics, biomedical sensors, engineering education, diversity in the engineering workforce, and technology enhanced learning. He learned problem solving from his father (ran a gray iron foundry), his mother (a nurse) and grandparents (dairy farmers). He has had the great good fortune to always work with amazing people, most recently professors teaching circuits and electronics from 13 HBCU ECE programs and the faculty, staff and students of the SMART LIGHTING ERC, where he is Education Director. He was ECSE Department Head from 2001 to 2008 and served on the board of the ECE Department Heads Association from 2003 to 2008.

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Dianna Newman University at Albany-SUNY

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Dr. Dianna Newman is a research professor in the Evaluation Consortium at the University at Albany/SUNY. Her major areas of study are program evaluation with an emphasis in STEM related programs. She has numerous chapters, articles, and papers on technology-supported teaching and learning as well as systems-change stages pertaining to technology adoption.

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John Okyere Attia P.E. Prairie View A&M University

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Dr. John Okyere Attia is Professor of the Electrical and Computer Engineering at Prairie View A&M University. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in Electrical and Computer Engineering in the field of Electronics, Circuit Analysis, Instrumentation Systems, and VLSI Design. Dr. Attia earned his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from University of Houston, an M.S. from University of Toronto and B.S. from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana. Dr. Attia has over 75 publications including four engineering books. His research interests include innovative electronic circuit designs for radiation environment, radiation testing, and power electronics. Dr. Attia is the author of the CRC book, Electronics and Circuits Analysis Using MATLAB, 2nd Edition He has twice received outstanding Teaching Awards. In addition, he is a member of the following honor societies: Sigma Xi, Tau Beta Pi, Kappa Alpha Kappa and Eta Kappa Nu. Dr. Attia is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Texas.

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Otsebele E Nare Hampton University

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Otsebele Nare is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at Hampton University, VA. He received his electrical engineering doctorate from Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, in 2005. His research interests include System-Level Synthesis Techniques, Microgrids, and K-16 Integrative STEM education.

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Abstract

The need for experimental centric learning in engineering education has been a major area of discussion and innovation for the last decade. Research has proven that, in general, the impact on student learning is beneficial. Little literature is available, however, on the impact of instructional use and learning setting when this approach is used. This paper presents preliminary results from a two year collaboration of 13 XXX electrical and computer engineering (ECE) programs working collaboratively on the development, implementation, and expansion of Experimental Centric based instructional Pedagogy (ECP) in essentially all engineering courses in which circuits and electronics play significant role. As of June 2015, the 13 participating institutions have produced, piloted, and internally distributed 64 curriculum modules and/or labs. The purpose of this paper is to provide preliminary results of an investigation of the relationship of learning setting and instructional use of experimental centric learning, especially for students of color. Learning settings studied include: 1) in traditional classrooms, 2) in lab settings and 3) as part of homework Variations by instructional use included: 1) instructor demonstration, 2) cooperative (and 3) independent student use. Student outcomes reflect gains in: 1) pre-requisites to learning; 2) immediate short-term learning; 3) long-term and transferable outcomes and 4) selected ABET characteristics (importance and preparedness). Findings indicate that both setting and instructional use do influence selected outcomes and that prior identified patterns of instructor development when incorporating new practices are upheld. The study begins a conversation on the implications of these influences and the need for further research on how students, faculty, and instructional practices change when using experimental centric learning.

Astatke, Y., & Connor, K. A., & Newman, D., & Attia, J. O., & Nare, O. E. (2016, June), Growing Experimental Centric Learning: The Role of Setting and Instructional Use in Building Student Outcomes Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.25427

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2016 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015