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Hands-on Learning Environment and Educational Curriculum on Collaborative Robotics

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Practices for Student Learning Engagement

Tagged Division

Manufacturing

Page Count

15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28428

Download Count

168

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Paper Authors

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Ana Djuric P.E. Wayne State University

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Dr. Ana Djuric is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Technology in the College of Engineering at Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. Dr. Djuric research areas are industrial robots, kinematics, dynamics, control, and advanced manufacturing systems. She supervises multiple undergraduate and graduate students in their research and is a member of Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR). Her Dipl.-Ing. degree is in the area of mechanical engineering from the University of Belgrade, Serbia, focusing in Control Systems. Her M.A.Sc. degree is in Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering from University of Windsor, Canada, area of Industrial Robotics, and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from University of Windsor, Canada in the area of Reconfigurable Robotics. Prior to her arrival at WSU, Dr. Djuric worked in the industry as a machine and tool designer first and then as a Robotics software Analyst for five years. Prior to joining WSU, Dr. Djuric was an Instructor at the Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering, and Industrial and Manufacturing and Systems Engineering departments at the University of Windsor.

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Jeremy Lewis Rickli Wayne State University

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Dr. Jeremy L. Rickli received his B.S. and M.S. Degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Michigan Technological University in 2006 and 2008 and received his Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech prior to joining Wayne State in 2013. At Wayne State, he has created the Manufacturing and Remanufacturing Systems Laboratory (MaRSLab). MaRSLab targets fundamental and applied research in manufacturing and remanufacturing processes and systems while encouraging considerations for sustainability and life-cycle thinking in design, manufacturing, use, and recovery. Specific research thrusts include: transforming manufacturing quality monitoring and remanufacturing core condition assessment via automated laser line scanning systems; remanufacturing core management considering uncertain core quality, quantity, and timing; and integrating design for disassembly and remanufacturing into CAD/CAM tools. He has collaborated in the past with industrial partners on projects involving residual stresses in lightweight aluminum alloy side rails, manufacturing process simulation, and enhancing end-of-life truck acquisition decisions. Dr. Rickli is also actively involved in outreach activities with Athletes for Charity STEM Youth Literacy Program, which provides Detroit Public Schools with STEM educational sessions.

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Vukica M. Jovanovic Old Dominion University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-8626-903X

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Dr. Vukica Jovanovic is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Technology in Mechanical Engineering Technology Program. She holds a Ph.D. from Purdue University in Mechanical Engineering Technology, focus on Digital Manufacturing. Her research is focused on mechatronics, digital manufacturing, digital thread, cyber physical systems, broadening participation, and engineering education. She is a Co-Director of Mechatronics and Digital Manufacturing Lab at ODU and a lead of Area of Specialization Mechatronics Systems Design. She worked as a Visiting Researcher at Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing in Disputanta, VA on projects focusing on digital thread and cyber security of manufacturing systems. She has funded research in broadening participation efforts of underrepresented students in STEM funded by Office of Naval Research, focusing on mechatronic pathways. She is part of the ONR project related to the additive manufacturing training of active military. She is also part of the research team that leads the summer camp to nine graders that focus on broadening participation of underrepresented students into STEM (ODU BLAST).

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Daniel Foster Old Dominion University

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Dr. Foster is an Assistant Professor at Old Dominion University in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Dr. Foster earned his BS, MS and PhD in Welding Engineering at The Ohio State University’s Department of Material Science and Engineering. During his time at The Ohio State, Dr. Foster worked on numerous welding and additive manufacturing projects funded by the National Science Foundation, The Ohio State University, and Ohio Space Grant Consortium fellowships. His current research is funded by the National Shipbuilding Research Program, the National Science Foundation, and the Virginia Space Grant Consortium. In addition, Dr. Foster also has had the honor of serving as a Faculty Fellow at NASA’s Glen Research Center.

Dr. Foster’s research focuses on advanced materials joining and additive manufacturing, with particular expertise in in-situ process monitoring. A current research effort of his includes Improving Technical Welding Education Using Real-Time Sensory Feedback, where his lab is developing and testing the real-time feedback of manual welding to increase efficiency and cost-savings during welding training. Other topics of his is Process Monitoring of Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing and Ultrasonic Welding. Future work includes linking in-situ data to process maps, creating a closed loop process monitoring system that can automatically adjust process parameters in real-time to ensure superior part quality.

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Abstract

The objective of this paper is to describe teaching modules developed at Wayne State University integrate collaborative robots into existing industrial automation curricula. This is in alignment with Oakland Community College and WSU’s desire to create the first industry-relevant learning program for the use of emerging collaborative robotics technology in advanced manufacturing systems. The various learning program components will prepare a career-ready workforce, train industry professionals, and educate academicians on new technologies. Preparing future engineers to work in highly automated production, requires proper education and training in CoBot theory and applications. Engineering and Engineering Technology at Wayne State University offer different robotics and mechatronics courses, but currently there is not any course on CoBot theory and applications. To follow the industry needs, a CoBot learning environment program is developed, which involves theory and hands-on laboratory exercises in order to solve many important automaton problems. This material has been divided into 5-modules: (1) Introduce the concepts of collaborative robotics, (2) Collaborative robot mechanisms and controls, (3) Safety considerations for collaborative robotics, (4) Collaborative robot operations and programming, (5) Collaborative robot kinematics and validation. These modules cover fundamental knowledge of CoBots in advanced manufacturing systems technology. Module content has been developed based on input and materials provided by CoBot manufacturers. After completing all modules students must submit a comprehensive engineering report to document all requirements.

Djuric, A., & Rickli, J. L., & Jovanovic, V. M., & Foster, D. (2017, June), Hands-on Learning Environment and Educational Curriculum on Collaborative Robotics Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/28428

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