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Hands On Projects Based On Message Passing Between Processes

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

6.537.1 - 6.537.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9326

Download Count

16

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Paper Authors

author page

Sub Ramakrishnan

author page

Mohammad Dadfar

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1420

Hands-on Projects Based on Message Passing Between Processes

Mohammad B. Dadfar, Sub Ramakrishnan

Department of Computer Science Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, Ohio 43403

Abstract

Message passing plays a critical role in all areas of data and computer communications course offerings. Examples include: TCP/IP and OSI suites, physical network architectures, client- server applications and remote procedures. This paper describes hands-on classroom projects that use the message passing paradigm for a course in data communications.

1. Introduction

The growth of Internet and related technologies have significantly increased the demand for skilled, Information Technology (IT), workforce. However, the supply chain has not grown proportionately. Computer Science departments around the country are trying to be responsive to industry needs in these emerging areas of the computing discipline. Exposure to application issues in the realm of computer communications and client-server computing are especially desirable skills for the graduating student population. Upper level courses on data and computer communications and web architectures have been seeing a surge in student enrollment. There are many textbooks in the area of data communications and computer networks1, 4, 7, 10, 11, 12. We have used several different textbooks in our course offerings. Depending on the topics covered in the course, and the level of students taking the course, some textbooks may be more appropriate than the others.

The computer networking area is changing rapidly and the choice of classroom projects has become a major task for instructors. To make the data communications course more useful, the practical part of the course is carefully designed so that students could relate the theoretical concepts to current issues in real-world networking. Many class projects have been proposed in the literature2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9. In this paper we describe several hands-on classroom projects that use the message passing paradigm. The first three projects are simple and may be assigned during the first part of the course. The fourth project (discussed in Section 4 and Section 5) can be assigned after the fifth week of a fifteen-week course.

Message passing plays a critical role in all areas of data and computer communications course offerings. Examples include: TCP/IP and OSI suites, physical network architectures, client- server applications and remote procedures. In the following sections we describe these projects. We also discuss several extensions to these projects. Our students are encouraged by these projects, find them to be a worthwhile learning experience, and feel that the projects integrate

Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2001, American Society for Engineering Education

Ramakrishnan, S., & Dadfar, M. (2001, June), Hands On Projects Based On Message Passing Between Processes Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9326

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