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Hands-On STEM Lesson Plans Developed through Engineering Faculty and STEM Teacher Collaboration (Evaluation)

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

K-12 & Pre-College Engineering Division: Fundamental & Research-to-Practice: K-12 Engineering Resources: Best Practices in Curriculum Design (Part 2)

Tagged Division

Pre-College Engineering Education Division

Page Count

20

DOI

10.18260/p.25446

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/25446

Download Count

1890

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Paper Authors

biography

Mary Ann Jacobs Manhattan College

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Mary Ann Jacobs, scc is an assistant professor in the School of Education. She prepares secondary teacher candidates in all content areas through her courses in secondary pedagogy. Her areas of interest include STEM education, brain compatible strategies, and action research in the classroom.

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Kathleen Christal Mancuso Manhattan College

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Kathleen Mancuso is a Secondary Education Major with a concentration in Chemistry at Manhattan College located in Riverdale, NY. As a senior, Kathleen will be graduating in February 2017 with a teaching certification for grades 5-12 in New York State and a B.S. in Education and Chemistry. Her passion for teaching began in her high school chemistry class with Mrs. Merante, after seeing just how valuable a talented and determined teacher was to future STEM fields. Kathleen enjoys teaching tennis over the summer to students ages 8-16 and is looking forward to her graduation to begin her career.

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Zahra Shahbazi Manhattan College

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Zhahra Shahbazi is as an assistant professor of Mechanical engineering at Manhattan College. She earned a B.S. degree from the University of Tehran (mechanical engineering), M.S. from Amir Kabir University of Techonology (biomedical engineering) and a Ph.D. degrees from the University of Conecticut (mechanical engineering). She also received a certificate in college instruction from the University of Connecticut. Her current research involves modeling and simulation of protein molecules as nano bio robots with applications in new drug design. The other aspect of her research is engineering education.

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Alexandra Emma Lehnes Manhattan College

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Alexandra Lehnes is a senior at Manhattan College majoring mechanical engineering and minoring in mathematics. In the past she has done biomechanical research on aortic aneurysms and worked for an energy distribution company as a project engineering intern. Currently she is the president of the engineering ambassadors club and assisting with an National Science Foundation grant to increase engineering awareness using the engineering ambassadors, offering a minor in engineering educations, and encouraging teachers to build an engineering lecture to present to their students. She is an active member of Tau Beta Pi, Pi Tau Sigma, Pi Mu Epsilon, Epsilon Sigma Pi, ASME, SWE, ASHRAE, and ASEE.

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Anthony Scotti Manhattan College

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Anthony Scotti is a Secondary Education Major with a concentration in Mathematics at Manhattan College in Riverdale, NY. As a senior, Anthony will be graduating in February 2017 with a Bachelor of Science in Education and Mathematics for teaching grades 4-12. Anthony is currently the Office Manager for the Higher Achievement Program at Fordham Preparatory School in the Bronx, NY, a program that prepares seventh grade boys for the Test for Admissions into Catholic High Schools. As a future STEM educator, Anthony looks forward to teaching students the amazing opportunities Mathematics can offer them.

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Abstract

With a shortage of engineering content in most middle and high schools, the Engineering STAR (Scholars Training and Retention) Center collaborated with engineering faculty and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) teachers to create and deliver lesson plans with an emphasis on engineering principles while teaching math and science. With an increased demand for STEM education available for all students, this professional development aims to expose educators to engineering topics they can present in their schools.

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of a professional development collaboration of college engineering faculty and middle and high school STEM teachers. This professional development is part of an NSF grant promoting engineering education. Three workshops over the course of three semesters enabled middle and high school STEM teachers to receive professional development in engineering topics from the engineering faculty. Simultaneously the engineering faculty received professional development from the teachers in effective classroom pedagogy. In nearly every model of effective STEM integration, the goal and intent is to provide learners with the opportunity to construct new knowledge and problem-solving skills through the process of designing artifacts. They accomplished this through a series of open-ended, hands-on activities related to a thematic topic that addressed important concepts related to STEM disciplines. This constructivist approach was implemented in this professional development experience.

Prior to the first session, engineering faculty proposed 12 engineering topics for teachers to select a topic that most closely aligned with their content area. In the first session, twenty-four STEM teachers and twelve engineering faculty members collaborated in studying the engineering topic and creating developmentally appropriate lesson plans which included a hands-on demonstration. The engineering faculty members used a variety of materials to demonstrate the overall ideas of their engineering concept and allowed teachers to internalize the concepts to eventually build and mold them into lessons that are applicable to middle and high school students. With the mentorship of the lead faculty member, teachers drafted lesson plans and found guidance from the engineering faculty when necessary to ensure effective planning and learning. The support from both the engineering faculty and educator allowed for each member to understand what each professional brings to their particular field.

STAR members met again in consecutive semesters to discuss and share the experiences, challenges, and accomplishments of their lessons and goals as they worked in the next session with an entirely new engineering subject. Successfully delivered lesson plans were posted to the STAR website and shared with faculty and teachers at the second and third sessions. Assessments to implement change and enhance professional development for the project included pre and post session surveys from faculty and STEM teachers and student surveys following the presented lessons.

Jacobs, M. A., & Mancuso, K. C., & Shahbazi, Z., & Lehnes, A. E., & Scotti, A. (2016, June), Hands-On STEM Lesson Plans Developed through Engineering Faculty and STEM Teacher Collaboration (Evaluation) Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.25446

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2016 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015