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Harvesting Electricity from Sound Waves: An Application of Faraday’s Law

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Engineering Physics and Physics Division Technical Session 2

Tagged Division

Engineering Physics and Physics

Page Count

11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37240

Download Count

66

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Paper Authors

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Bala Maheswaran Northeastern University

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Bala Maheswaran, PhD
Northeastern University
367 Snell Engineering Center
Boston, MA 02115

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Smeet Patel Northeastern University

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Hello! I am a second year mechanical engineering student at Northeastern University. I am deeply interested in aerospace, robotics, and energy.

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James Flanagan

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Carly Tamer Northeastern University

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Nadav Nielsen Northeastern University

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Candidate for Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

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Matt Prescott

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Haridas Kumarakuru Northeastern University

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Haridas Kumarakuru, PhD
Department of Physics,
College of Science,
100 Forsyth street,
Boston, MA 02115
E.Mail: h.kumarakuru@neu.edu

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Abstract

Sound is a fascinating tool in human life. We encounter sound pollution every day from hearing, talking, transportation, and much more. This is one source of energy that is often overlooked as a frontier to use to our advantage. An abundance of sound pollution is constantly being wasted as it dissipates back into the environment. This study introduces the concept of converting the energy stored in sound waves into electricity through the application of Faraday’s Law. This is accomplished using a diaphragm, magnetic field, and wiring. The diaphragm of the device captures the kinetic energy of the sound and transfers it to the wiring, causing a minor movement of the wire within the magnetic field. This movement leads to variable magnetic flux. When the magnetic flux through a conductor changes, an electromotive force is produced. With electrons now engaged, a current is therefore induced, and, in turn, an electrical charge. We successfully produced voltage from soundwaves of varying frequencies using this device. This shows that accessing sound energy with this device is not only possible but with a loud enough source and an optimized design, it can produce usable quantities of electricity. The energy produced in this application can be used in education, and even in the industry if scaled up. The voltage was measured in the presence of 3 different frequencies and 3 trials were performed for each of those frequencies. The ANOVA test conducted in this paper shows that the data is statistically significant. The most important result of the experiments is that a statistically significant AC signal, produced only when exposed to sound, thereby proves that sound is causing the electrical signal. It is extremely likely that, when scaled up and in the right conditions, our device could supply usable electricity by recovering energy from the sound.

Maheswaran, B., & Patel, S., & Flanagan, J., & Tamer, C., & Nielsen, N., & Prescott, M., & Kumarakuru, H. (2021, July), Harvesting Electricity from Sound Waves: An Application of Faraday’s Law Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37240

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