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Helping Engineering and Computer Science Students Find Joy in Their Work

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Technology and Design in Engaging and Analyzing Ethics

Tagged Division

Engineering Ethics

Page Count

11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28431

Download Count

67

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Paper Authors

biography

Kenneth W. Van Treuren Baylor University

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Ken Van Treuren is an Associate Professor in the Department of Engineering at Baylor University. He received his B. S. in Aeronautical Engineering from the USAF Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado and his M. S. in Engineering from Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. After serving as USAF pilot in KC-135 and KC-10 aircraft, he completed his DPhil in Engineering Sciences at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom and returned to the USAF Academy to teach heat transfer and propulsion systems. At Baylor University, he teaches courses in laboratory techniques, fluid mechanics, energy systems, and propulsion systems, as well as freshman engineering. Research interests include renewable energy to include small wind turbine aerodynamics and experimental convective heat transfer as applied to HVAC and gas turbine systems.

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Cynthia C. Fry Baylor University

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Cynthia C. Fry is a Senior Lecturer of Computer Science and Director of the Computer Science Fellows program at Baylor University. She teaches a wide variety of engineering and computer science courses, co-leads the Engineering & Computer Science Faculty Development Seminars, and is a KEEN Fellow.

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William M. Jordan Baylor University

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William Jordan is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Baylor University. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in metallurgical engineering from the Colorado School of Mines, an M.A. degree in theology from Denver Seminary, and a Ph.D. in mechanics and materials from Texas A & M University. He teaches materials-related courses and does work in the area of mechanical behavior of composite materials. He is also interested in entrepreneurship and appropriate technology in developing countries.

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John Edward Miller Baylor University

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John Miller is a Senior Lecturer in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department at Baylor University. He teaches a wide range of courses, including the first-year program, mid-level laboratories, control systems, and capstone design. These courses lean heavily on hands-on experience and active learning. He has a B.S. and M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Baylor University, and currently serves as the Assistant Chair for the department.

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Abstract

As educators, the foremost goal is to graduate students technically prepared to fulfil their degree requirements. While they may be technically competent, certified by a diploma, have we as educators prepared our students to meet the challenges in the workplace, whatever they may be? There are some non-traditional topical areas that should be addressed before these students enter the workforce. We often do not connect work with character qualities such as integrity, loyalty, dependability, or even a religious faith. These qualities, when actively developed in our students, result in a “value added” that will make our students more desirable as employees. Developing a “passion” for the workplace or a strong desire to work for a particular company or sector of the market is also something that can be developed. The challenge is first, to model these qualities in our own work and second, to infuse this mindset into our students so they see the world and their work in a different way. Only then can our students truly be prepared to face the challenges of the workplace. Only then will they experience the joy of work. The hope is for our students to discover what they were gifted to do, something to which they are innately drawn or called. In doing what one is designed to do, the implication is that one will find greater meaning and fulfillment in the work they do, and in so doing, be of greater value to the company or industry for which they work. This paper will explore these “value added” character qualities of a Baylor engineer or computer scientist.

Van Treuren, K. W., & Fry, C. C., & Jordan, W. M., & Miller, J. E. (2017, June), Helping Engineering and Computer Science Students Find Joy in Their Work Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/28431

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