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How can we Help Faculty Balance Between Teaching and Scholarly Activities?

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Faculty Development

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Page Count

22

Page Numbers

22.780.1 - 22.780.22

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/18061

Download Count

23

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Paper Authors

biography

Cheryl B. Schrader Boise State University

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Cheryl B. Schrader is Associate Vice President for Strategic Research Initiatives and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Boise State University, where she previously served nearly eight years as Dean of the College of Engineering. Dr. Schrader has an extensive record of publications and sponsored research in the systems, control and engineering education fields. She received the 2005 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Engineering and Mathematics Mentoring from the White House for an enduring, strong, and personal commitment to underrepresented engineering students and faculty; and the 2008 Hewlett-Packard/Harriett B. Rigas Award from the IEEE Education Society in recognition of her contribution to the profession. Dr. Schrader earned her B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Valparaiso University, and her M.S. in Electrical Engineering and Ph.D. in Systems and Control from University of Notre Dame.

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Seung Youn Chyung Boise State University

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Seung Youn (Yonnie) Chyung is a professor in the Department of Instructional and Performance Technology in the College of Engineering at Boise State University. She received her Doctor of Education degree in Instructional Technology from Texas Tech University and teaches graduate-level courses on evaluation methodology. Her research interests include the development of self-regulated e-learning strategies for adult learners and the pedagogical use of technology, and she has published research papers in the Advances in Engineering Education and the ASEE proceedings, as well as other organizational performance improvement related journals.

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William L. Hughes Boise State University

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Dr. William L. Hughes, Assistant Professor of Materials Science & Engineering, joined Boise State University (BSU) in August 2008. Dr. Hughes holds a B.S. in Materials Science & Engineering with a minor in Bioengineering from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech). He also holds a Ph.D. in Materials Science & Engineering with a minor in Physical, Chemical, and Biological Sensors/Probes from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). His Ph.D. thesis explored the synthesis, characterization, discovery, and modeling of zinc oxide nanostructures for piezoelectric applications. In conjunction with his Ph.D., Dr. Hughes was also sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to partner with and teach at TECH High, a metro-Atlanta charter high school.

Upon completion of his Ph.D., he was then dually-appointed as a National Academy of Engineering (NAE), Center for the Advancement of Scholarship on Engineering Education (CASEE) Post-Doctoral Fellow, as well as an Assistant Professor of Materials Engineering at the California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly), San Luis Obispo. He is currently working in the field of DNA Nanotechnology for biomedical applications.

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Kotaro Sasaki Boise State University

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Kotaro Sasaki is an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering at Boise State University. He earned his B.S. degree in Biophysical Engineering from Osaka University in Japan, M.A. in Kinesiology and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. After finishing his work as a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, he joined Boise State University in 2008. His research focus is computational biomechanics, investigating muscle mechanical functions in the lower and upper extremities during dynamic motor activities.

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Teresa Cole Boise State University, Computer Science Department

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Teresa Cole is a lecturer in computer science at Boise State University. She received a MS in Computer Science from Boise State University, a Ph.D. in Physics from Brown University and a B.S. in Physics from Purdue University.

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John N. Chiasson Boise State University

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Dr. Chiasson is currently on the faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Boise State University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, his M.S. from Washington State University and his B.S. from the University of Arizona. His research interests include nonlinear control and identification methods for electric machines and power electronics.

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Abstract

How Can We Help Faculty Balance Between Teaching and Scholarly Activities?Whether it is more teaching-oriented or more research-oriented, a university needs dedicatedteachers, productive researchers, and effective administrators, and faculty members areincreasingly expected to balance multiple roles and responsibilities. Especially in universitieswhere research productivity is emphasized more than teaching effectiveness, untenured facultymembers might find it challenging to balance between their teaching and research activities.Also, when faculty members favor a balanced emphasis between research and teaching, but theyperceive that the institution places greater emphasis on research than on teaching, it could createpotential conflict between faculty values and university culture. Further, assigning high priorityto one activity over the other might be influenced by institutional reward and support systems.This issue has been an important one for our institution, especially the College of Engineering(COEN), as the college plays an important role in contributing to achieving the institutional goalof becoming a more research-oriented university. Therefore, the purpose of this study was tobetter understand the COEN faculty’s perceptions in the following: 1) their ideal and actualworkload ratios between teaching and scholarly activities (e.g., research and grant activities), 2)the current evaluation and reward systems, and 3) institutional support. We, the college’sTeaching & Learning Committee, conducted a survey with the COEN full-time faculty membersin May, 2010. A total of 69 COEN full-time faculty members were invited to participate in ananonymous survey, and 42 of them (61%) completed the survey.We analyzed the survey data by faculty rank, and the following are some of the main results: Overall, the COEN faculty members’ ideal and self-reported actual ratios between teaching and scholarly activities do not match (the ideal - 48:52; the actual - 60:40). The COEN faculty members’ desire to engage in scholarly activities increases (while their ideal teaching load ratio decreases) as their rank changes from assistant professor to associate professor, and to full professor. Many untenured assistant professors are not aware of the evaluation methods the institution is using for measuring teaching effectiveness and productivity of scholarly activities. The COEN faculty members, regardless of their rank, expressed that they would need additional environmental and administrative support to successfully balance quality in both teaching and scholarly activities.To develop solutions for providing better environmental and administrative support to faculty,we categorized the faculty input into 5Ps: (1) personnel (e.g., more TAs, graders, IT staff), (2)place (e.g., more lab/classroom space), (3) policy (e.g., reduced teaching loads and class sizes),(4) procedure (e.g., reduced paperwork), and (5) professional development (e.g., just-in-timeworkshop and faculty mentoring). In this paper, we will present the study results in detail andprovide implications of the findings, particularly for supporting new engineering faculty.

Schrader, C. B., & Chyung, S. Y., & Hughes, W. L., & Sasaki, K., & Cole, T., & Chiasson, J. N. (2011, June), How can we Help Faculty Balance Between Teaching and Scholarly Activities? Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/18061

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