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How Making and Maker Spaces have Contributed to Diversity and Inclusion in Engineering: A [non-traditional] Literature Review

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Conference

2018 CoNECD - The Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity Conference

Location

Crystal City, Virginia

Publication Date

April 29, 2018

Start Date

April 29, 2018

End Date

May 2, 2018

Conference Session

Undergraduate Track - Technical Session II

Tagged Topic

Undergraduate Education

Page Count

13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29543

Download Count

345

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Paper Authors

biography

Adam Stark Masters Virginia Tech

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Adam S. Masters is a doctoral student and Graduate Research Assistant at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. They received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from University of Delaware and are currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Engineering Education at Virginia Tech. Adam's research interests include access, equity and social justice in engineering with particular attention to the experiences of women & LGBTQ+ engineering students.

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Abstract

The Maker Movement, complete with the opening of maker spaces around the country, has been positioned as an ‘equalizer,’ a way to give more people access to the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. The movement has emerged concurrent with the push to institute active learning in educational spaces; both making and active learning give learners hands-on experiences. In addition, the Maker Movement offers open-sourced technical instruction and creative, supportive spaces for people to apply and advance their understanding of practical STEM knowledge. Its goals were/are to increase access to STEM fields by engaging people from all backgrounds in making. This literature review investigates the promises that were made about making’s potential as an ‘equalizer’ or force to help broaden participation and support diversity, and explores documentation of the actual impact the Maker Movement has had on diversity and inclusion of underrepresented and minority participants in engineering.

Masters, A. S. (2018, April), How Making and Maker Spaces have Contributed to Diversity and Inclusion in Engineering: A [non-traditional] Literature Review Paper presented at 2018 CoNECD - The Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity Conference, Crystal City, Virginia. https://peer.asee.org/29543

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