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How Songbirds Learn to Sing Provides Suggestions for Designing Team Projects for Computing Courses

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Conference

2018 Mid Atlantic Section Fall Meeting

Location

Brooklyn Technical High School, Brooklyn, New York, New York

Publication Date

October 26, 2018

Start Date

October 26, 2018

End Date

October 27, 2018

Page Count

9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31453

Download Count

36

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Paper Authors

biography

Ashwin Satyanarayana New York City College of Technology

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Dr. Ashwin Satyanarayana is currently an Associate Professor with the Department of Computer Systems Technology, New York City College of Technology (CUNY). Prior to this, Dr. Satyanarayana was a Research Scientist at Microsoft in Seattle from 2006 to 2012, where he worked on several Big Data problems including Query Reformulation on Microsoft’s search engine Bing. He holds a PhD in Computer Science (Data Mining) from SUNY, with particular emphasis on Data Mining and Big data analytics. He is an author or co-author of over 25 peer reviewed journal and conference publications and co-authored a textbook – “Essential Aspects of Physical Design and Implementation of Relational Databases.” He has four patents in the area of Search Engine research. He is also a recipient of the Math Olympiad Award, and is currently serving as Chair Elect of the ASEE (American Society of Engineering Education) Mid-Atlantic Conference. He also serves as an NSF (National Science Foundation) panelist.

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Radhika Tulasi Natarajan

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Radhika is currently a high school senior at Liberty High School in Frisco, TX. Radhika works as an instructor at a computer science school that teaches kids K-12 coding concepts and logical thinking skills. Radhika designed and taught summer camp curriculum in robotics, game development, programmable drones, and visual arts, and also teaches after school classes focused on learning the fundamentals of programming languages. Radhika has also competed in the USA Computing Olympiad and advanced to the silver division at the January 2018 contest.

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Lior Baron CUNY Graduate Center

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Lior is currently a Computer Science PhD graduate student in City University of NY (CUNY) Graduate Center. In parallel, Lior is the heading the data analytics practice in a midsize advisory firm in Atlanta, GA and has been working in the data analytics and performance improvement field for more that 15 years. Lior earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Computer Science from Technion I.I.T. and his MBA from New York University – Stern School of Business

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Abstract

Understanding how our brain works and how we learn is perhaps one of the greatest challenges facing twenty-first century science. Songbirds are good candidates for trying to unravel some of this mystery. Over the last decade, a large amount of research has been made to better understand how songbirds learn. The Canary (Serinus canaria) and the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata) have been widely used bird models to study these brain and behavior relationships. Like songbirds, we humans are vocal and social learners. In such learners, the development of communication is initially steered by social interactions with adult tutors. Their song development is further shaped through interactions with peers and by attending to the consequences of others interacting. In this paper, we review prior research which demonstrate some techniques used by songbirds to address of challenges of teaching complex songs to their young ones. We then present some of the challenges of teaching computing courses to high school students. We finally show that the same tutoring strategies used by songbirds have and can be used successfully to teach complex computing concepts in high schools. Some of these strategies for teaching computer science courses involve using real-world activities, hands-on experiences, contextualizing abstract concepts, active learning, collaborative peer-based learning, and learning by trial and error.

Satyanarayana, A., & Natarajan, R. T., & Baron, L. (2018, October), How Songbirds Learn to Sing Provides Suggestions for Designing Team Projects for Computing Courses Paper presented at 2018 Mid Atlantic Section Fall Meeting, Brooklyn Technical High School, Brooklyn, New York, New York. https://peer.asee.org/31453

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