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Human Bone Solid Mechanics Challenge: Functionally Graded Material Structure With Complex Geometry And Loading

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Anything New in the Mechanics of Materials?

Tagged Division

Mechanics

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

13.676.1 - 13.676.15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4163

Download Count

56

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Paper Authors

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Arturo Fuentes University of Texas-Pan American

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Stephen Crown University of Texas-Pan American

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Bob Freeman University of Texas-Pan American

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Human Bone Solid Mechanics Challenge: Functionally Graded Material Structure with Complex Geometry and Loading Abstract

This paper presents a series of solid mechanics challenges that are being developed to reinforce solid mechanics concepts and to illustrate the relationship between classical mechanics of solids and finite element stress analysis while highly motivating students. The challenges are being developed through an interaction with VANTH, an NSF funded Engineering Research Center for Bioengineering Educational Technologies, that introduced the authors to the How People Learn framework for the design of effective learning environments and challenge/problem based learning module development. The authors have supplemented the HPL theory with explanations of the Legacy learning cycle from a new point of view and with new implementation ideas. To reinforce solid mechanics concepts and to illustrate the relationship between solid mechanics analytical solutions and numerical solutions, the authors are developing a series of challenges that use web-based games and the involvement of students in the game design process, combined loading bone problems and the involvement of students in learning through teaching, the concept of functionally graded material structures and their potential applications, and the challenges faced in the analysis of graded materials with complex geometries. The objectives of the challenges include reinforcing students’ understanding about solid mechanics and the difference between analytical and numerical solutions, and fostering students’ interest in the finite element stress analysis for design and research. According to the authors, students are motivated to learn when they understand the connections between the subject matter and their interests, values, goals, and career aspirations and that long term success may depend upon their ability to access and apply what they have learned. The first challenge can be utilized in High School physics courses with the remaining challenges appropriate for undergraduate college level instruction in solid mechanics and introduction to Finite Element Analysis. Challenges contain screen capture movies, computer games, and materials developed by undergraduate students. Furthermore, the initial impact of the challenge on the students and on the solids mechanics course is described. The challenges integrate course content across discipline boundaries and help students build connections between related and seemingly unrelated concepts. The challenges demonstrate to students that their education is the process of building an integrated knowledge base that will ultimately prepare them for applying that knowledge in their career.

Introduction

This paper presents a series of solid mechanics challenges that are being developed to reinforce solid mechanics concepts and to illustrate the relationship between classical mechanics of solids and finite element stress analysis while highly motivating students. The challenges are being developed through an interaction with VANTH, an NSF funded Engineering Research Center for Bioengineering Educational Technologies, that introduced the authors to the How People Learn1 (HPL) framework for the design of effective learning environments and challenge/problem based instruction. The challenges are based on the STAR Legacy learning cycle2,3. The authors have supplemented the HPL theory with explanations of the Legacy learning cycle from a new point

Fuentes, A., & Crown, S., & Freeman, B. (2008, June), Human Bone Solid Mechanics Challenge: Functionally Graded Material Structure With Complex Geometry And Loading Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/4163

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