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Hydrogen Generation for Future Energy Applications

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

ECCD Applications

Tagged Division

Energy Conversion and Conservation

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

19

Page Numbers

26.869.1 - 26.869.19

DOI

10.18260/p.24206

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24206

Download Count

112

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Paper Authors

biography

James V. Masi University of Southern Maine

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Dr. James Masi is a Professor Emeritus from Western New England University and a Professor in Engineering at the University of Southern Maine. He has a B.S. and M.S. in Physics and a Ph.D. in Applied Science (Material Science) from the University of Delaware. He is widely published and has numerous patents in many fields over his 50 years in the field. He has mentored many students/researchers.

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biography

Daniel M Martinez University of Southern Maine

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Dr. Daniel M. Martinez received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering at the University of Rochester in western New York. He continued there to pursue a Ph.D., and after qualifying for entry into the program left for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland to conduct his graduate laboratory research. At Goddard he studied nucleation phenomena, specifically vapor to particle conversion of metals in a gas evaporation condensation chamber. At the end of his Ph.D. work, Martinez became active in a non-profit energy corporation, AHEAD Energy, whose mission is to increase energy access in the developing world. There he became interested in understanding energy use and impacts from the perspectives of both the developed and the developing worlds and worked as a postdoctoral fellow through AHEAD and the University of Rochester. Since joining USM in 2008, Martinez has worked on both research and teaching, published an energy textbook, and has been the architect of the Department of Environmental Science and Policy's Applied Energy Curriculum.

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James A Wilson United States Navy Civil Engineer Corps

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ENS James Wilson was born in Portland, Maine and graduated from South Portland High School. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in September 2005 and attended basic training at Recruit Training Center Great Lakes, IL. For his first assignment, ENS Wilson reported to training squadron VAW-120 in Norfolk, VA as a plane captain for the E2-C Hawkeye and C-2A Greyhound where he advanced to the designation of Aviation Electrician Airman. In 2007 ENS Wilson transferred to Point Mugu, CA and reported to squadron VAW-113. He advanced to Aviation Electricians-Mate Third Class Petty Officer and completed 2 deployments aboard the USS Ronald Reagan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Honorably discharged from the Navy in 2009, he attended the University of Southern Maine (USM) and graduated Magna Cum Laude in May 2013 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Electrical Engineering and a minor in Mechanical Engineering. He completed a 10 week internship for NASA at Johnson Space Center, where he designed a microstrip patch antenna for the International Space Station for use in RFID technology. After graduating from USM, ENS Wilson reported to Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI and was commissioned on September 20th, 2013. Following OCS, he reported to Civil Engineer Corps Officer School (CECOS) in Port Hueneme, CA graduating in CECOS Basic Class 256 in May 2014. In May 2014, ENS Wilson reported to Naval Air Station Corpus Christi as a construction manager where he has managed 45 projects worth over $20 million.

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Benjamin Richard Male United States Navy Civil Engineer Corps

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Benjamin Male was born in Schenectady, New York and graduated from Niskayuna High School in 1999. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in May 2003 and attended basic training at Recruit Training Center Great Lakes, IL. From August 2003 to January 2005, he completed an array of naval technical schools including Naval Nuclear Field “A” School for Electronics Technicians and Naval Nuclear Power School, both at NNPTC Charleston, SC, as well as Naval Nuclear Prototype at NNPTU Ballston Spa, NY. For his first assignment, he reported aboard the fast attack submarine USS Charlotte (SSN-766) in March 2005 as a Reactor Operator where he progressed to Electronics Technician Petty Officer First Class. After being honorably discharged from the Navy in 2009, he attended the University of Southern Maine (USM). His senior year, he received the Outstanding Student in Electrical Engineering Award and graduated Summa Cum Laude in May 2013 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Electrical Engineering and a minor in Mechanical Engineering. After graduating from USM, Ben reported to Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI and was commissioned as an Ensign in the United States Navy on August 23rd, 2013. Following OCS, ENS Male reported to Civil Engineer Corps Officer School (CECOS) in Port Hueneme, CA, graduating in CECOS Basic Class 256 in May 2014. In May 2014, ENS Male reported to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion THREE and is currently serving as a Platoon Commander in Charlie Company in addition to the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Officer in Charge.

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Abstract

Hydrogen Generation for Future Energy ApplicationsThe purpose of this research is to develop a method to produce and store hydrogen gas as analternate energy source. Hydrogen gas has the potential to be used as an inexpensive, clean andsafe replacement to the standard lithium hydroxide batteries and fossil fuels which are currentlyused for the majority of society’s energy needs. This paper discusses in detail how sodiumborohydride (NaBH4) reacts with acetic acid (CH3COOH) and polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) toproduce hydrogen gas. This paper addresses the experimental steps taken in order to determinethe byproducts of the two reactions, such as: CO2 determination, thermal imaging data,temperature data and the effect of injection rates on the production of hydrogen gas.By utilizing theoretical and experimental data, one can determine the byproducts of thesereactions, which can then be used to calculate the thermodynamics and kinetics behind thechemical equations. In our experiments, the quantities of sodium borohydride and acetic acidwere varied in order to determine if the amount of gas produced was linear with time. Ourexperimental setup was constantly refined until it mirrored previous experiments performed innumerous scientific journals. The steps taken to achieve these goals are discussed. Thetemperature of each reaction was monitored and recorded, as well as the amount of gas producedand the quantity of the reactants used. The reaction byproducts were studied under a microscopeand the crystalline structure was documented in microscope screen captures at variousmagnifications. The thermodynamics behind the reactions were calculated to include: heats offormation for each reactant and product as well as the Gibbs free energy of the reaction. Thesecalculations helped confirm the previous predictions and show whether the reaction isexothermic or endothermic. We measured the effect of varying the injection rate of the acid andthe added “storage component, PVAc on the reaction and how different concentrations of aceticacid impact the amount of hydrogen gas produced and stored in the residual polymer. The pHchange of the reaction, the pH drive, and the effect of different color laser irradiationwavelengths on the PVAc reaction were also evaluated. Some discussion on polyvinyl alcohol(PVA) is included.These experiments are easily reproduced in the university laboratories and provide an excellentbase for discussions on energy, hydrogen, and energy storage potential.

Masi, J. V., & Martinez, D. M., & Wilson, J. A., & Male, B. R. (2015, June), Hydrogen Generation for Future Energy Applications Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24206

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