Asee peer logo

Identifying NSF S-STEM Sponsored Program Activities that Have a Positive Impact on Mechanical Engineering S-STEM Scholars

Download Paper |

Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Mechanical Engineering Technical Session: Outreach and Retention

Tagged Division

Mechanical Engineering

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

12

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34746

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/34746

Download Count

141

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Liang Zhu University of Maryland, Baltimore County

visit author page

Liang Zhu received her B.S. in Engineering Thermophysics from the University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China, in 1988, and Ph.D. in Engineering from the City University of New York, New York, USA, in 1995. Currently, she is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). Her research fields include using nanotechnology to improve treatment outcomes of cancer patients. She is also interested in Engineering Education research, and currently she serves as the Director of Mechanical Engineering S-STEM Scholarship Program at UMBC.

visit author page

biography

Jamie R. Gurganus University of Maryland, Baltimore County

visit author page

Jamie Gurganus works in the MechanicalEngineering Department at UMBC, focusing in the field of Engineering Education. She serves as the Associate Director of Engineering Education Initiatives for the College of Engineering and IT at UMBC and as Co-Director of Advancing Excellence in P12 Engineering Education (AEEE). Her research is focused on solving problems relating to educating engineers, teachers, and the community. She seeks to identify best practices and develop assessments methods that assist teachers with student engagement, helping them to be successful throughout the STEM pipeline.
A few of these key areas include enhancing student’s spatial abilities (k-12 and higher education), integrating service learning into the classroom, implementing new instructional methodologies, and design optimization using additive manufacturing.

visit author page

biography

Charles D. Eggleton University of Maryland, Baltimore County

visit author page

Dr. Charles Dionisio Eggleton is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. He has twenty-two years of experience teaching theoretical and laboratory courses in thermo-fluids to undergraduate students and was Department Chair from 2011 -2017. Dr. Eggleton earned his M.S. and Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Stanford University and his B.S. in Naval Architecture from the University of California.

visit author page

author page

Ronghui Ma University of Maryland, Baltimore County

author page

Timmie Topoleski University of Maryland, Baltimore County

biography

Deepa Madan University of Maryland, Baltimore County

visit author page

Dr. Deepa Madan is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore. She joined the UMBC faculty in 2016. Dr. Madan received her post-doctoral training in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. She received her PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, where she developed cost-effective thermoelectric generators to power wireless sensor networks. Her research interests are in composite and polymer thermoelectric materials and devices, rechargeable batteries, and additive manufacturing techniques.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Due to current needs for a diverse and skilled workforce in engineering, the NSF-sponsored Mechanical Engineering (ME) S-STEM Scholarship Program in our institution (2009-present) has provided enhanced educational opportunities to more than 100 economically disadvantaged and academically talented undergraduate students in the ME Department since 2009. The NSF funded S-STEM project focuses resources on financial support, coupled with curricular and co-curricular activities designed to facilitate student degree attainment, career development, employability in STEM-related jobs, and enrollment in graduate school. In addition, our S-STEM program proactively implements engineering research-related activities, including research presentations for recruitment, in-depth lab tours, seminars, REUs, research conference support, featuring research/internship on our website, etc.

In this study, we present preliminary data that reveal the attitudes and perceptions of the current 25 ME S-STEM scholars based on surveys conducted this year. The scholars were asked to provide their opinion on the impact that the activities sponsored by our S-STEM program had on their attitudes and perceptions. Results have demonstrated that faculty and peer mentoring are the most effective methods contributing to positive attitudes and perceptions. In addition, research-related activities such as lab visits, REUs, research seminars, attending research conferences, and internship opportunities are viewed favorably by the scholars as helping them establish their science/engineering self-efficacy and engineering identity, and understand their expectations and goals. On the other hand, in addition to mentoring, community building activities such as program retreats, social events, and being part of a professional society are considered as contributing to help them integrate into the campus life and improve their sense of belonging to the campus and program. In June 2019, all but two scholars were retained in our scholarship program; those who remained in the program consider all S-STEM activities favorable to their retention. Among the 10 scholars who graduated from the ME undergraduate program in the past year, 40% of them stated that they will pursue graduate degree, 20% will work in industry, and the other 40% will work in industry and enroll in a graduate school as a part-time student. Those 10 scholars identified faculty and peer mentoring, all the research-related activities sponsored by our program, internship, and social interaction with faculty and their peers as positive factors that helped them make their decisions.

Zhu, L., & Gurganus, J. R., & Eggleton, C. D., & Ma, R., & Topoleski, T., & Madan, D. (2020, June), Identifying NSF S-STEM Sponsored Program Activities that Have a Positive Impact on Mechanical Engineering S-STEM Scholars Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34746

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2020 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015