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Identity and Design Process in Adult, Non-traditional, Engineering Students: Phase I: Training for Extending Prior Studies

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees’ Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

26.879.1 - 26.879.10

DOI

10.18260/p.24216

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/24216

Download Count

108

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Paper Authors

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Maria-Isabel Carnasciali University of New Haven Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/https://0000-0001-5887-0744

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Maria-Isabel Carnasciali is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Tagliatela College of Engineering, University of New Haven, CT. She obtained her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Tech in 2008. She received her Bachelors of Engineering from MIT in 2000. Her research focuses on the nontraditional engineering student – understanding their motivations, identity development, and impact of prior engineering-related experiences. Her work dwells into learning in informal settings such as summer camps, military experiences, and extra-curricular activities. Other research interests involve validation of CFD models for aerospace applications as well as optimizing efficiency of thermal-fluid systems.

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Shannon Ciston University of California, Berkeley

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Shannon Ciston is a Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Education in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Ciston holds degrees in chemical engineering from Northwestern University (PhD) and Illinois Institute of Technology (BS). She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in technical communications and applied pedagogy, and conducts engineering education research.

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Christina A. Foy University of New Haven

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Bachelors of Arts in Psychology from State University of New York at Albany, May 2009. Master of Arts in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at the University of New Haven, May 2013.

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Pedro S. H. Kim University of California, Berkeley

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Candidate for Bachelor of Arts in Resource Management (Interdisciplinary Research Studies) with a minor in Chemical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, May 2015.

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Emi Okada Okada University of California, Berkeley

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Bachelor's of Chemical Engineering and Material Science and Engineering from University of California, Berkeley. August, 2013

American River College, Sacramento, California. August, 2011-August, 2013

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Audrianna V Rodriguez University of New Haven

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Bachelors of Arts in Psychology from Cleveland State University, May 16, 2013. Candidate for Master of Arts in Community Psychology at the University of New Haven, May 2016.

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Abstract

Identity and Design Process in Adult, Non-traditional, Engineering Students: Phase I: Training for Extending Prior StudiesAdult students comprise a significant percentage of undergraduate learners, 10% withinengineering programs. Whereas gender and ethnic diversity are commonly studied aspects,studies involving student age comprise a much smaller set of the available literature within theengineering education field. To increase the diversity and number of engineers in the workforce,it is critical that adult students be supported through degree completion.Our work aims to create new pathways for non-traditional engineering students by examining therole of prior work experiences, identity, and expertise. The work supported by NSF REESEcollects and analyzes qualitative and quantitative data from non-traditional engineeringundergraduate students at three diverse institutes of higher education: a large public university ( -------- ), a small private university ( -------- ), and a community college ( -------- ). We foresee thedata providing critical insights to enable engineering educators to be more effective, and makingsubstantial contributions to our understanding of engineering identities and students’ thinkingprocesses. By filling gaps in current understanding of the identities, level of expertise, andexperiences of these students, the study aims to improve persistence outcomes for engineeringstudents and increase the number of qualified engineering graduates.In an effort to leverage existing data, we have set out to replicate the work carried out byAtman/Cardella (2007) and Matusovich et al (2011) with a new study population comprised ofundergraduate students aged 25 and over. The paper/poster will detail our efforts to train ourresearch team of engineering and social science students in carrying out these experiments with ahigh degree of fidelity to the original studies. This work is being carried out at universities thatdo not have students focused on engineering education research; we describe the process bywhich we trained students to collect the data and actively participate in the research. Features ofour training include: human subjects research training with a focus on the Belmont Report and itsapplications, training in semi-structured interviewing, analysis of the publications from the priorrelated work, practice data collection sessions, role-playing, training on thematic coding, andfinally deployment in real data collection.

Carnasciali, M., & Ciston, S., & Foy, C. A., & Kim, P. S. H., & Okada, E. O., & Rodriguez, A. V. (2015, June), Identity and Design Process in Adult, Non-traditional, Engineering Students: Phase I: Training for Extending Prior Studies Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.24216

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