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IEEE Real World Engineering Projects (RWEP)

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

New Trends in ECE Education II

Tagged Division

Electrical and Computer

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

25.713.1 - 25.713.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/21470

Download Count

42

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Paper Authors

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Seyed Hossein Mousavinezhad Idaho State University

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Seyed Hossein Mousavinezhad is professor and Chair, Electrical Engineering Department, Idaho State University. He is active with ASEEECE Division, is IEEE Education Society's Membership Development Chair, and is Van Valkenburg Awards Committee Chair. Mousavinezhad is founding General Chair of International IEEE Electro Information Technology Conferences, http://www.eit-conference.org/.

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Paul J. Benkeser Georgia Institute of Technology

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Paul J. Benkeser is a professor and Senior Associate Chair in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. He is past chair of ASEE BED and has served a number of roles for IEEE EMBS. He and is currently a member of the BMES Accreditation Activities Committee and serves as a Commissioner for ABET EAC.

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Pamela Bhatti Georgia Institute of Technology

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Pamela Bhatti is an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Bhatti received her B.S. in bioengineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1989 and her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 2006, with an emphasis on micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS). Before completing her Ph.D., she researched the detection of breast cancer with ultrasound imaging at the University of Michigan’s Department of Radiology (1997-1999). Her industry experience includes embedded systems software development at Microware Corporation, Des Moines, Iowa (1996-1997), local operating network applications development and support at Motorola Semiconductor in Austin, Texas (1994-1995), and research and clinical fabrication of controlled-release drug delivery systems at Alza Corporation in Palo Alto, Calif. (1986-1990). Bhatti received the NSF CAREER Award in 2011.

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Burton Dicht IEEE

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Burton Dicht is currently Director of IEEE University Programs, where he is responsible for directing IEEE’s engineering education accreditation activities and for developing programs for faculty and students. Immediately before joining IEEE, Dicht was the Managing Director of ASME’s Knowledge and Community Sector. Dicht began his career in the aerospace industry in 1982 and held the position as a lead engineer for Northrop Grumman and Rockwell Space Transportation Systems Division. He has worked on such projects as the F-5E Tiger II, the F20A Tigershark, the F-18E/F Super Hornet, the YF-23A Advanced Tactical Fighter, and the Space Shuttle. Dicht is a member of IEEE, AIAA, and an ASME Fellow. Dicht received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Temple University and an M.A. in history from California State University, Northridge.

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Douglas Gorham IEEE

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Douglas Gorham is the Managing Director of the IEEE Educational Activities Department, Secretary to the IEEE Educational Activities Board and a Senior Member of the IEEE. He is responsible for the department’s programs,
products and activities including continuing education, pre-university education, university education, standards education, IEEE-HKN, and Women in Engineering.
He has served as the Staff Lead in organizing many events and projects involving engineering educators, industry, government, and pre-university educators. He is the Staff Lead in the creation and expansion of IEEE’s Teacher In-Service Program and TryEngineering.org, and served as the Staff Lead for “Transforming Engineering Education: Creating Interdisciplinary Skills for Complex Global Environments,” held in April 2010. He serves as the Staff Lead in expanding IEEE’s efforts to establish accrediting bodies around the world to assure quality in the engineering and computing curricula. Prior to his tenure at IEEE, Gorham served as a high school educator for 26 years, including 12 years as a high school principal. He earned his Ed.D. from the University of Illinois, UC, a master's degree from Northern Illinois University and a bachelor's degree from Elmhurst College.

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Chris Macnab University of Calgary

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Chris Macnab received his B.Eng. in engineering physics from the Royal Military College of Canada in 1993. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1999, where he attended the Institute for Aerospace Studies and investigated stable neural-adaptive control of flexible-joint robots. He worked at Dynacon Systems and at CRS Robotics (now Thermo CRS Ltd.) in Toronto. He is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Calgary where his current research interests include adaptive, fuzzy, and neural-network control applied to flexible-joint robots, helicopters, haptic teleoperation, and biped running robots.

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Sadiq Mitchell IEEE

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Sadiq Mitchell is a University Education Program Manager in the Educational Activities Department of IEEE. Mitchell holds a master's of arts degree in information technology from Stevens Institute of Technology. She is currently the IEEE Professional Partner supporting the Real World Engineering Project (RWEP), among other university education initiatives.

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Cherrice Traver Union College

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Cherrice Traver received her B.S. in physics from the State University of New York at Albany in 1982 and her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia in 1988. She has been a faculty member at Union College in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department since 1986, and was the Dean of Engineering from 2005 to 2011. Recently, Traver has been involved in initiatives at the interface of engineering and the liberal arts. She has led two national symposia on engineering and liberal education at Union College and she was General Chair for the 2008 Frontiers in Education conference. Her teaching interests are in the computer engineering area including digital design, embedded systems, and VLSI. She has co-taught international project courses in Turkey and in Spain. Her research has been focused on timing issues in digital systems. She has directed local and national outreach programs, including Robot Camp and the P. O. Pistilli Scholarship.

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Stephen M. Williams P.E. Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Stephen Williams is professor of electrical engineering and computer science and Program Director of Electrical Engineering at the Milwaukee School of Engineering . He has 25 years of experience across the corporate, government, and university sectors. His interests are in design, control systems, embedded systems, and electromechanics.

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Loren Wyard-Scott University of Alberta

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Loren Wyard-Scott is a Faculty Service Officer in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. His primary teaching role is in the area of electrical engineering design.

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Abstract

IEEE Real World Engineering Projects (RWEP) ABSTRACTAs part of IEEE's mission to serve engineering faculty worldwide, the IEEE Women inEngineering (WIE) Committee along with the Educational Activities Board (EAB) created theReal-World Engineering Projects (RWEP) program. The goal of the RWEP program is toprovide university educators of electrical engineering (EE), computer engineering (CE),computer science (CS), biomedical engineering (BE) and electrical engineering technology(EET) world-wide with a library of high-quality, tested, hands-on, team-based, and society-focused projects for first-year students. These projects are designed to increase the recruitment,persistence to degree, and satisfaction of all students, in baccalaureate EE, CE, CS, BE and EETdegree programs. In many EE/CE/CS/BE/EET programs, current first-year curricula focus on thetheoretical and mathematical components of engineering. The vehicle for change is a series ofIEEE-approved hands-on projects that educators are able to use in the first-year classroom inorder to "adhere" their students to these disciplines. The projects clearly demonstrate a benefit tosociety in general and also involve the students at a more intimate level than the typical lecture.Research has shown the recruitment of women gains significantly from the illustration of howelectrical and computer engineers and computer scientists benefit society. The persistent under-participation of women in engineering and computer science is an area of continued concern togovernments, industry leaders, policy making bodies, and professional associations.RWEP projects allow first-year ECE and other engineering, science and technology students todiscover the importance of various engineering and computer related fields of study in solvingcontemporary problems, and elicit excitement about creative problem solving. This programprovides faculty world-wide with fully developed curriculum modules with about two-weekduration that include first-year projects, showcasing how engineers impact society, illustratingreal-world problems, allowing students to experience trade-offs in the design process, givingteamwork experience, as well as providing discovery-based activities in the Science,Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields which have attracted considerableamount of attention during the last few years in the US and throughout the world. Benefits ofRWEP program for STEM educators include students discovering excitement of real-worldproblems and understand the importance of IEEE fields to society. These projects are designed toincrease recruitment, retention and persistence to degree of STEM students. The review andassessment process used by the RWEP advisory committee includes: one-page abstractsubmission (reviewed double-blind), project proposal submission and full curriculum modulesubmission that is vetted by a subject matter expert (SME). IEEE Awards are made forcompleted projects that are ready for posting in the portal for world-wide use(IEEE Regions 1-10.)Authors of the abstract believe that this paper if accepted will be of benefit to ASEE ECEDivision members as well as faculty in other disciplines included in the American Society forEngineering Education (ASEE.)

Mousavinezhad, S. H., & Benkeser, P. J., & Bhatti, P., & Dicht, B., & Gorham, D., & Macnab, C., & Mitchell, S., & Traver, C., & Williams, S. M., & Wyard-Scott, L. (2012, June), IEEE Real World Engineering Projects (RWEP) Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/21470

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