Asee peer logo

Illustrating Bioseparations With Colorful Proteins

Download Paper |

Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Innovations in ChE Labs

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

10.713.1 - 10.713.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/14317

Download Count

22

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

Brian Lefebvre

author page

Stephanie Farrell

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Illustrating bioseparations with colorful proteins Brian G. Lefebvre and Stephanie Farrell Rowan University

Abstract

Advances in biology are prompting new discoveries in the biotechnology, pharmaceutical, medical technology, and chemical industries. Developing commercial-scale processes based on these advances requires that new chemical engineers clearly understand the biochemical principles behind the technology, in addition to developing a firm grasp of chemical engineering principles.1 This paper outlines the development of educational materials in biochromatography, one of the major techniques used to separate and purify biological molecules.

This project aims to determine operating conditions for displaying the separation of colorful proteins in a variety of course settings. Anion exchange chromatography demonstrations have been developed, showing that a mixture of flavodoxin (orange color) and green fluorescent protein (green color) can be selectively eluted at different salt concentrations, providing a powerful demonstration of the principles of protein binding and elution. These concepts have been expanded to full-scale experiments suitable for unit operations laboratories or upper-level biochemical engineering electives. This paper describes how these visually-appealing demonstrations and lab exercises centered on bioseparations can be incorporated into lecture- and lab-based chemical engineering courses.

Introduction

Advances in biology are prompting new discoveries in the biotechnology, pharmaceutical, medical technology, and chemical industries. Developing commercial-scale processes based on these advances requires that new chemical engineers clearly understand the biochemical principles behind the technology, in addition to developing a firm grasp of chemical engineering principles.1 To successfully deliver this knowledge to students, engineering educators require additional resources to illustrate relevant biological concepts throughout the curriculum.

This paper outlines the development of educational materials in biochromatography, one of the major techniques used to separate and purify biological molecules. In a typical bioprocess, the majority of the costs are associated with isolating and purifying the desired biological compound.2 In many of the later stages of purification, over 50% use some type of chromatography.3 Exposing students to biochromatography provides an introduction to bioseparations and the underlying biochemistry concepts. As separation processes are based on the physical and chemical properties of the product and chief impurities, a wide range of concepts can be included, such as overall cell composition, protein biochemistry, recombinant protein production techniques, and bioprocess optimization.

Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2005, American Society for Engineering Education

Lefebvre, B., & Farrell, S. (2005, June), Illustrating Bioseparations With Colorful Proteins Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. https://peer.asee.org/14317

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2005 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015