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Impact Of Federal Funding On Minority Institutions

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

ASEE Multimedia Session

Page Count

6

Page Numbers

8.654.1 - 8.654.6

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/11478

Download Count

12

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Paper Authors

author page

Annette George

author page

Gbekeloluwa Oguntimein

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2793

Impact of Federal Government Funding of an Internship Program at a Minority Institution

Gbekeloluwa Oguntimein1, Annette George2 1 Department of Civil Engineering / 2Dean’s Office, Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland 21251.

Abstract:

Involving students in research has been recognized as a strategic method for developing and preparing undergraduate students to gain valuable insights into the workforce, particularly into science and engineering careers. Federal funding to minority institutions has proven to be one of the most strategic and successful vehicles used in achieving this goal. This paper reports on the impact of funding through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Agreement, between the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a federal agency, and Morgan State University (MSU), a minority institution. Under the agreement, a grant was awarded to MSU allowing students to participate in research projects at various EPA facilities across the country. From 1991 to present over one hundred and sixty (160) students have participated in the program. The execution of the program and outcomes of this program are presented in this paper. As a result of the success of the program, the grant was recently renewed to continue the program for another three (3) years, with renewable options. The new Agreement has been expanded to include the following: • Faculty fellowships • Training and site visits to EPA facilities by MSU faculty and students • Supply of surplus equipment from EPA to MSU, to help meet the needs of current and planned education, research, and training programs • Seminars on opportunities for research grants, minority graduate/undergraduate fellowships, • How to partner with small business and other institutions.

Introduction

Morgan State University (MSU) is one of the one hundred and fourteen (114) historically black colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the country. It is the designated urban university in Maryland charged with the mission of providing a comprehensive array of programs and services to the citizens and organizations of the Baltimore metropolitan area. Its three major mission components are (1) to educate citizens from diverse academic and socioeconomic backgrounds, (2) to carry out research, giving priority to what’s applicable to the problems of the region and its residents, and (3) to provide cultural opportunities for the region and offer programs of services to the community and the general public. MSU was founded in 1867, as a Centenary Biblical Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright ©2003, American Society for Engineering Education

George, A., & Oguntimein, G. (2003, June), Impact Of Federal Funding On Minority Institutions Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/11478

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