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Impact of varying in-class time on student performance and attitudes in a flipped introductory computer programming course

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Conference

2019 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting

Location

California State University, Los Angeles , California

Publication Date

April 4, 2019

Start Date

April 4, 2019

End Date

April 6, 2019

Conference Session

PSW Section Meeting Papers - Disregard start and end time - for online paper access only

Tagged Topic

Pacific Southwest Section Meeting Paper Submissions

Page Count

14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31830

Download Count

140

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Paper Authors

biography

Paul Morrow Nissenson California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

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Paul Nissenson (Ph.D. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Irvine, 2009) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. He teaches courses in fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, computer programming, and numerical methods. Paul's current research interests involve studying the impact of technology in engineering education.

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Abstract

This paper builds upon an earlier study investigating the impact of a flipped classroom format on student performance and perceptions in an introductory computer programming course for mechanical engineers at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona). In the previous study, moving from a traditional lecture format (which met 100 min/week) to a flipped classroom format (which met 75 min/week) did not hurt academic performance and students had an overwhelming positive experience in the flipped section. However, the sample size was small and it was the author’s first time teaching a flipped course. The current study has two goals: (1) Gather additional data by repeating the experiment using lessons learned from the previous study; (2) Examine the impact of varying the amount of in-class time on both flipped classroom sections and traditional lecture sections. Data was collected during Fall Quarter 2014 and Winter Quarter 2015 in four sections: Two sections were taught in a traditional lecture format (one section met twice per week for 50 minutes and the other section met once per week for 110 minutes) and two sections were taught in a flipped classroom format (one section met once per week for 75 minutes and the other section met once per week for 110 minutes). In the flipped sections, students were required to watch short video tutorials prior to each class meeting and given quizzes in class to ensure compliance. Class time was used for example problems and “Team Battles,” an active learning exercise where student teams competed against each other to complete programming assignments for prizes. Academic performance on six quizzes and exams were compared and it was found that the flipped sections generally outperformed the traditional lecture sections on the high-stakes assessments (midterm and final exams), resulting in a noticeable difference in the overall course grades – in both flipped sections at least 50% of students received an A- or A, while less than 20% of students in the traditional lecture sections received an A- or A. Additionally, students in the flipped section that met for 110 min/week generally outperformed all other sections on the quizzes and exams. Pre-course and post-course surveys revealed that students in all four sections found the video tutorials helpful and their opinion about computer programming improved by the end of the course. Students in the flipped sections overwhelmingly enjoyed the Team Battles and felt they were effective, and thought the amount of in-class time was sufficient to learn the material.

Nissenson, P. M. (2019, April), Impact of varying in-class time on student performance and attitudes in a flipped introductory computer programming course Paper presented at 2019 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting, California State University, Los Angeles , California. https://peer.asee.org/31830

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