Asee peer logo

Implementation of a Future Faculty Development Program: Impact and Evaluation of Years 1 & 2

Download Paper |

Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

New Engineering Educators 2: Success In and Out of the Classroom

Tagged Division

New Engineering Educators

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

15

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34769

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/34769

Download Count

15

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

David Gau University of Pittsburgh

visit author page

David Gau, PhD is a Postdoctoral Associate in the bioengineering department. Dr. Gau earned his BPhil in bioengineering and BS in Mathematics from the Pitt in 2012. After, he was awarded a Whitaker Fellowship and Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship to study and work in Australia for a year before returning and completing his PhD in bioengineering at Pitt in 2018. His pre-doctoral research focused on screening and developing novel agents to target aberrant and excessive angiogenesis, or blood vessel formation, was supported by NSF GRFP, Cardiovascular Bioengineering Training Program, and the Provost Development Fund. He continued his work in the Cell Migration Lab at the University of Pittsburgh after defending his thesis on novel compounds that inhibit excessive blood vessel formation. David has published 7 first author publications and has presented his work at local, national, and international conferences. In his spare time, Dr. Gau serves as the University of Pittsburgh Postdoctoral Association President. He is also the Director for University Engagement for the Pitt STRIVE Program at the Swanson School of Engineering, a program which supports underrepresented minority graduate engineering students.

visit author page

biography

Deanna Christine Easley Sinex University of Pittsburgh Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-7159-3689

visit author page

Deanna C.E.Sinex is a Bioengineering Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pittsburgh. She earned her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her research involves the development and application of engineering concepts and active learning techniques in clinical and institutional learning environments to help improve the literacy of fundamental, yet critical aspects of health.

visit author page

biography

Mary E. Besterfield-Sacre University of Pittsburgh

visit author page

Dr. Mary Besterfield-Sacre is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor in Industrial Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the Founding Director for the Engineering Education Research Center (EERC) in the Swanson School of Engineering, and serves as a Center Associate for the Learning Research and Development Center. Her principal research is in engineering education assessment, which has been funded by the NSF, Department of Ed, Sloan, EIF, and NCIIA. Dr. Sacre’s current research focuses on three distinct but highly correlated areas – innovative design and entrepreneurship, engineering modeling, and global competency in engineering.

visit author page

biography

Steven Abramowitch University of Pittsburgh

visit author page

Dr. Abramowitch’s is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering in the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the director of the Translational Biomechanics Laboratory where his research applies approaches from mechanical testing, image analysis, mathematical and computational modeling, and device design to solve problems related to female pelvic health. He has secured funding from the NIH, DOD, NSF, and other sources to support these efforts. He is also co-director of 2 NSF sponsored programs focused on the success of underrepresented minorities and a national award winner (BMES 2019) for his work in diversity and inclusion.

visit author page

biography

Sylvanus N. Wosu University of Pittsburgh

visit author page

Sylvanus Wosu is the Associate Dean for Diversity Affairs and Associate Professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at the University of Pittsburgh. Wosu's research interests are in the areas of impact physics and engineering of new composite materials, dynamic problems in composites failure, and energy containment and responses of dynamical systems. Wosu is also interested in engineering education with particular interests in development models for effective recruitment, retention, and mentoring of women and under-represented students. Other research interests include experimental investigation of the dynamic failures and crack propagation of cylindrical composite storage tank with particular interests in the development of hydrogen storage tanks, failure behaviors of hydrogen-diffused porous composite materials, and the containment of the associated hydrogen embrittlement. Wosu established an integrative dynamic impact and high speed imaging system at the University of Pittsburgh Department of Mechanical Engineering that is capable of simulating low and high strain rate penetration loading and capturing the dynamic event at two million frames per second. Special sample fixtures he developed are used to study perforation impact and single and multi-mode fracture tests and general characterization of materials failure. His other research interests include experimental nuclear medical physics, laser-based medical physics research in cerebral metabolic pathways of oxygen, petro physics, and petroleum fluid characterization of reservoirs.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Diversifying STEM faculty proves to be an increasing challenge for research universities. This conference paper will discuss the outcome of a future faculty discovery and development program. This program is a two-day program designed for underrepresented minorities (URM) doctoral and post-doctoral scholars interested in an academic career in engineering and within 1-2 years of seeking a faculty position. Participants experience structured presentations and discussions/dialogues with department chairs, deans, and early career faculty members. Participants are expected to gain greater awareness of how to navigate recruitment and interviews, cultures of research, teaching, mentoring, service, support opportunities, and tenure and promotion. The program also initiates early exploration and discussion of career prospects with school of engineering department chairs. The present study will discuss evaluation surveys from the first two years of the future faculty discovery and development program (2018, 18 participants, and 2019, 10 participants) and outcome/current placement of participants. The evaluation included feedback on workshops, content presented, impact on desire to transition into the professoriate, and impact on envisioning a successful career at the hosting university. This study will compare our future faculty development program with outcomes from other future faculty programs with intention to develop a conceptual framework to evaluate programmatic strategies with the targeted audiences.

Gau, D., & Sinex, D. C. E., & Besterfield-Sacre, M. E., & Abramowitch, S., & Wosu, S. N. (2020, June), Implementation of a Future Faculty Development Program: Impact and Evaluation of Years 1 & 2 Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34769

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2020 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015