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Implementation Of A Mems Laboratory Course With Modular, Multidisciplinary Team Projects

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

12.831.1 - 12.831.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2357

Download Count

17

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Paper Authors

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John Lee San Jose State University

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JOHN LEE is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at San Jose State University. He teaches in the areas of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), manufacturing processes, mechanical design, and dynamics. He conducts research in microfluidics and micromechanics applied to MEMS design and fabrication. Contact: sjlee@sjsu.edu.

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Stacy Gleixner San Jose State University

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STACY GLEIXNER is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering at San Jose State University. She teaches courses on introductory materials engineering, electronic materials, solid state kinetics and thin film deposition. Prof. Gleixner has an active research program in microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Contact: gleixner@email.sjsu.edu.

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Tai-Ran Hsu San Jose State University

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TAI-RAN HSU is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at San Jose State University. He teaches dynamics, engineering analysis and microsystems design, manufacture and packaging. His research interest is in the electromechanical design of MEMS and reliability in assembly and packaging of microsystems. Contact: tairan@email.sjsu.edu.

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David Parent San Jose State University

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DAVID PARENT is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at San Jose State University. He teaches courses and conducts research in semiconductor device physics, integrated-circuit (IC) manufacturing, digital/mixed signal IC design and fabrication, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Contact: dparent@email.sjsu.edu.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Implementation of a MEMS Laboratory Course with Multidisciplinary Team Projects

Abstract

This paper presents the implementation and outcomes of a hands-on laboratory course in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), co-developed by a multidisciplinary team of faculty from mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and materials engineering. Central to the design of the course is an emphasis on implementing modules that are able to overcome critical barriers related to (1) diverse academic background from different majors and (2) practical limitations in microfabrication facilities. These points are vital for promoting MEMS education, because they expand the student pool and reach audiences that need a cost-effective way to support instructional laboratory experiences in MEMS without the broader infrastructure that is often limited only to large research institutions.

Laboratory projects emphasize skills in design, fabrication, and testing, while a classroom lecture portion of the course provides corresponding background theory. The paper provides technical description of three modular projects that have been implemented in the course. These encompass a variety of MEMS fabrication approaches, including surface micromachining, bulk micromachining, and soft lithography. These distinct methods are exercised in three corresponding devices: a silicon pressure sensor, an aluminum suspended beam, and a polymer microfluidic chip. These projects illustrate principles and reinforce student learning of important phenomena commonly involved in MEMS, such as piezoresistivity, electrostatics, stiction, residual stress, and electrokinetics. The modules are arranged with different levels of emphasis among design, fabrication, and testing, to reach higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy while simultaneously balancing time and resource constraints in a practical manner. Feedback from student opinions and plans for improvement are also presented.

Introduction

The multidisciplinary subject of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) requires a broad range of background knowledge and skills. MEMS engineering demands important contributions from the fields of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, materials engineering, and other disciplines. In an effort to make hands-on MEMS education more accessible to engineering students, a new laboratory course has been developed and instituted at San José State University, built upon a framework reported previously[1]. This framework addresses two critical barriers that limit effective learning in MEMS: (1) different course pre- requisite background for students coming from a broad range of academic majors, and (2) prohibitive overhead in terms of facilities, cost, and time for microscale prototyping and fabrication. The problem of mixed background knowledge is addressed by assembling student teams such that the members collectively satisfy specific functional pre-requisites, even though they come with a wide variety of prior course backgrounds. The problem of limited design freedom under practical constraints is addressed by using lower-resolution geometric design rules and standardized processes that facilitate semi-custom design[1].

Lee, J., & Gleixner, S., & Hsu, T., & Parent, D. (2007, June), Implementation Of A Mems Laboratory Course With Modular, Multidisciplinary Team Projects Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. https://peer.asee.org/2357

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