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Implementation Of Classroom Assessment Techniques And Web Technology In An Operations Research Course

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Conference

1999 Annual Conference

Location

Charlotte, North Carolina

Publication Date

June 20, 1999

Start Date

June 20, 1999

End Date

June 23, 1999

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

4.294.1 - 4.294.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7715

Download Count

64

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Paper Authors

author page

Sima Parisay

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2663

Implementation of Classroom Assessment Techniques and Web Technology in an Operations Research Course Sima Parisay California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Abstract

This paper introduces the process and discusses the analysis for upgrading a course, Operations Research. The direction for upgrading the course was based on the objectives of the department, the requirements by employers, and the new Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET 2000) criteria. This course is a senior level course for Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering students. The course was upgraded in two directions: (1) implementation of a classroom (course) assessment portfolio, and (2) implementation of web technology. Details of the assignments and tests, used as pedagogical tools in this course, are explained. The collection of these assignments and tests in a self-assessed and nonselective/working portfolio are described. The second direction for upgrading the course was utilizing Web-based tools as another computer-based instructional tool. As the first step in this direction, part of the information for this course was provided on the Internet, as well as utilizing a threaded message board. The concerns in design of web pages are explained. Instructor’s perception is that the upgrading directions for this course were effective in the learning process, improved some of the required skills, provided feedback for future improvements of the course, and enhanced efficiency of the class sessions. Feedback from the students was generally positive and indicated considerable achievement of these objectives.

1. Introduction

In recent years, there have been many tools proposed for improving the outcome of the educational process in the classroom. Outcome is defined as the amount of knowledge and skills that are obtained by the students. Some of the proposed tools stress on incorporation of web- based technologies. At the same time, many techniques have been suggested for assessing the learning process. Classroom assessment techniques are considered powerful tools for enhancing learning.

I have selected to upgrade a course, Operations Research I, which I have taught for several years. This is a senior level course that covers Linear, Integer, and Goal programming as well as Transportation techniques. The course is being offered in a ten-week quarter system. At the time I started this experiment, I had some students who had neither used email nor searched the Internet. Some students had problems with required background knowledge and skills, such as mathematical techniques, writing, communication, and computer technology. I started with identifying the most important objectives that were critical for our students’ needs. These objectives were based on the objectives of the department, the requirements by employers, and the criteria for ABET 2000. Based on the selected objectives, the course was upgraded in two directions: (1) implementation of a classroom assessment portfolio and (2) implementation of web technology.

Parisay, S. (1999, June), Implementation Of Classroom Assessment Techniques And Web Technology In An Operations Research Course Paper presented at 1999 Annual Conference, Charlotte, North Carolina. https://peer.asee.org/7715

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