Asee peer logo

Implementing A Multi Faceted Approach For Promoting Diversity In Graduate Engineering Education

Download Paper |

Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Issues of Diversity in Graduate Engineering Education

Tagged Division

Graduate Studies

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

13.706.1 - 13.706.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3758

Download Count

37

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Eugene DeLoatch Morgan State University

visit author page

Eugene Deloatch is Dean of Morgan State College of Engineering. He served as the President of ASEE in 2002-2003.

visit author page

biography

Sherra Kerns Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering

visit author page

Sherra Kerns is Vice President for Innovation and Research at the Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering. She served as the President of ASEE in 2005-2006.

visit author page

biography

Lueny Morell Hewlett-Packard

visit author page

Lueny Morell is Director of Hewlett Packard Latin America University Relations Program and former Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez.

visit author page

biography

Carla Purdy University of Cincinnati

visit author page

Carla C. Purdy is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Cincinnati.

visit author page

biography

Paige Smith University of Maryland

visit author page

Paige Smith is Director of the Women in Engineering Program, James A. Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland.

visit author page

biography

Samuel Truesdale Rolls-Royce Corporation

visit author page

Samuel L. Truesdale is Manager of Employee Development, Strategic Engineering, Business Improvement and the Chair of the Engineering Education Council at the Rolls-Royce Corporation.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Implementing a Multi-faceted Approach for Promoting Diversity in Graduate Engineering Education

Abstract

For the past several years, we have, through panel discussions and presentations, been engaged in exploring how to encourage diversity in graduate engineering education. While the percentages of women and minorities earning engineering graduate degrees are increasing, they still (except for women at the masters' level) lag behind the percentages earning bachelor's degrees. A diverse graduate population is important because engineers with graduate training will be at the forefront of leadership and change, in both academia and industry, as we confront the many ways in which we will need to make creative use of technology in the coming years. Participants in these discussions have included university faculty and staff and industry representatives. Our discussions have clarified some of the obstacles to diversifying the graduate population, including lack of mentoring and constructive advice, lack of a community for graduate students at a particular institution, and unwritten rules and assumptions which can affect graduate student admission and overall success. In this presentation we review the literature on diversity in graduate education and we describe, for each group of stakeholders in the process of graduate education, policies and activities that have been presented in the literature and that have emerged during our discussions that can help to overcome some of these obstacles. We discuss initiatives that can be carried out effectively by individuals or small groups, initiatives that can be supported by industry and by other groups external to the university, and initiatives that require institutional support. Not surprisingly, successful projects draw support from several of these groups. Major stakeholders who can affect graduate education at an individual institution include individual graduate students, student organizations, and supportive corporate sponsors. Major stakeholders who could help with institutionalization include not only university and college administrators and engineering faculty but also government and nongovernmental organizations, as well as corporate sponsors. Our goal in this session is to offer specific examples of successful initiatives and to begin to develop resources for others interested in encouraging diversity at the graduate level. Over the next year we will continue to collect information about exemplary programs, projects, and activities that facilitate increased diversity in graduate engineering education. Information on these initiatives will be maintained on the Graduate Studies Division web page, along with the papers which have appeared in this series of panel sessions and a summary of best practices.

Introduction

While many excellent programs exist for increasing diversity among precollege and undergraduate students and among faculty, programs targeting graduate students have received less attention. While some programs designed specifically for students at the graduate level have been established, many others exist as add-ons, either to faculty development programs or as extensions of programs for undergraduate students. There are several reasons why encouraging diversity at the graduate level is more difficult. As noted previously in our discussions on this subject1,2,3,4, graduate student programs tend to be administered by individual departments rather than by central offices, and individual students may be recruited into specific laboratories.

DeLoatch, E., & Kerns, S., & Morell, L., & Purdy, C., & Smith, P., & Truesdale, S. (2008, June), Implementing A Multi Faceted Approach For Promoting Diversity In Graduate Engineering Education Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3758

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015