Asee peer logo

Implementing Embedded Control into Projects Designed by Students With Little or No Programming Experience

Download Paper |

Conference

2020 First-Year Engineering Experience

Location

East Lansing, Michigan

Publication Date

July 26, 2020

Start Date

July 26, 2020

End Date

July 28, 2020

Page Count

7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/35772

Download Count

38

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Samuel John Wayne State University

visit author page

I finished my Batchelor's in Electronics and Instrumentation Engineering. I also completed my MS in biomedical engineering. Currently, I am a 2nd year Ph.D. candidate in Biomedical Engineering, focussed in Biomedical Imaging. My thesis is using Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging for designing and developing novel Image-guided procedures to treat diseases. I had 3 years of experience in designing Arduino based projects for Students. I was involved in the development of custom Arduino boards and add on Arduino modules for a company I worked during my undergraduate days. I have designed more than 30 Arduino based projects including EEG controlled robotic arm, Rehabilitation devices, ECG based pocket doctor, Alexa based speed monitoring device, Nursing Simulation Temperature Device, Smart Image-Guided Mapping Autonomous Robot for Teeth Numbing, deaf-mute interpreter and ultrasound elastography device. I have worked in Imaging projects involving MRI, ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging. I have won 2 hackathons, several Arduino competitions, and poster competitions. My aim in life is to combine my knowledge of robotics, electronics, and medical imaging for the development of Image-guided technologies for a better tomorrow.

visit author page

author page

Cameron Hanson Wayne State University

biography

James Lenn Wayne State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-1696-0914

visit author page

James Lenn has been at Wayne State University since 2013, first as part time faculty and more recently as a Lecturer. He teaches a freshman design course and several electrical engineering courses. Prior to taking a position at WSU, he had worked in industry as an engineer and engineering manager for roughly 30 years.

visit author page

biography

Marcis Jansons P.E. Wayne State University

visit author page

Marcis Jansons, Ph.D., P.E.
Marcis Jansons has been on the faculty of Wayne State University’s College of Engineering since 2008, researching topics in advanced engine combustion and optical diagnostics at the University’s Center for Automotive Research (CAR). As an Associate Professor of the Mechanical Engineering Department, he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on combustion engines, fluid mechanics and emissions formation processes. Prior to joining Wayne State, he has worked for the energy industry as an environmental engineer addressing air, soil and groundwater contamination; and served as an instructor of Mechanical Engineering at the United States Coast Guard Academy. Jansons holds B.S. (1990), M.S. (1992) and Ph.D. (2005) degrees in Mechanical Engineering, earning his doctorate from Rutgers University for his work on combustion diagnostics and infrared imaging. He is a registered Professional Engineer (P.E.). Jansons has authored over forty peer-reviewed, engine-related publications, and is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and on the Board of Associates of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Internal Combustion Engine Division (ICED). He is a 2012 recipient of SAE’s Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award, conferred in recognition of significant contributions to teaching, research and student development and a 2015-16 Fulbright Scholar. Jansons has twenty years’ experience working with optical engines, and leads a research group of qualified and experienced graduate students. Jansons serves as the Director of Early Engineering Programs, administering the core group of STEM courses common to the various engineering academic programs.

visit author page

biography

Jeffrey Potoff Wayne State University

visit author page

Dr. Jeffrey Potoff is a Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, and the Associate Dean for Academic for the College of Engineering at Wayne State University. Potoff received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University in 1999, and his BS in Chemical Engineering in 1994 from Michigan State University. Prof. Potoff is interested on improving the engagement of engineering students in their coursework through the implementation of evidenced-based teaching practices.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

This is an abstract for a full paper and describes an approach to providing students in a hands-on, first-year engineering design class who have little or no computer programming experience, with the opportunity to implement embedded computer control into their projects. The design class introduces students to Computer Aided Design (CAD), Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM), design for manufacturing, three-dimensional (3D) printing, and embedded computer control. Because of time constraints imposed by the length of a semester, instruction focuses on CAD, 3D printing and the engineering design process, leaving insufficient time for an in-depth discussion of computer programming and other matters pertinent to embedded control. Because of a desire to provide students with a rudimentary understanding of embedded control, a new initiative was begun in the fall 2019 semester where embedded control capability can be incorporated into projects by students with little or no programming experience. In order to bridge the gap between the desire for providing an understanding of embedded control and the lack of time for in-depth instruction of pertinent skills, a set of “Standard Embedded Control Modules” have been developed for student use. These modules consist of a set of standard electrical/electronic hardware components along with the standard software modules which provide the intelligence to exercise control of those hardware components. Undergraduate teaching assistants, along with the instructor, help student teams in selecting the modules required depending on the selected project. It is then incumbent upon the student teams to design appropriate mechanical interfaces, follow electrical build instructions, and define required functionality for implementation into their projects. This initiative was introduced in a handful of projects during the fall 2019 semester and has had a positive impact on making projects more realistic, on capturing student interest, and generating enthusiasm among students. This paper will provide an overview of our approach and lessons learned.

John, S., & Hanson, C., & Lenn, J., & Jansons, M., & Potoff, J. (2020, July), Implementing Embedded Control into Projects Designed by Students With Little or No Programming Experience Paper presented at 2020 First-Year Engineering Experience, East Lansing, Michigan. https://peer.asee.org/35772

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2020 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015